The Advancing Guitarist

by Mick Goodrick

(1987) Hal Leonard #0-88188-589-4

Description Mick lays out all the groundwork for mastering the fingerboard and the psychology of playing in a deep, informative, but always humorous way.
Posted By Christopher Sung (9641)
Directory Books/Tab: Jazz
Rate/Review This Resource
Overall Rating: 4.8 (of 5)
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From 5 votes total

Member Reviews


On 11/28/1999, John Rice (551) posted:
Overall Rating:
All about getting your brain in gear and learning how to think about music and the guitar.
Suitable for all skill levels of guitarists
On 10/1/1999, Jeremy Cotton (7938) posted:
Overall Rating:
The only problem I have with the book is that it is sometimes a bit too Zen and abstract..although I would recommend everyone buy it and study from it.
Suitable for intermediate guitarists
On 8/10/1999, Sam Munro (1500) posted:
Overall Rating:
Get it. Oh Please get it. You owe it to yourself to get it. You reeeeeeeeally really! have to have this book. Is my point coming across? 8-]
Suitable for advanced guitarists
On 8/10/1999, Inactive Member posted:
Overall Rating:
I bought this book some years ago and, even though I've read it numerous times, I've yet to digest all the stubstance it has to offer. There is simply no end to this thing -- it will keep you busy for what seems an eternity. Advancing Guitarist is an absolute must for anyone interested in jazz.
Suitable for intermediate guitarists
On 5/20/1999, Christopher Sung (9641) posted:
Overall Rating:
For anyone who's ever spent time in the jazz scene in Boston, you've undoubtably seen or perhaps even met Mick. He's a funny, offbeat guy and an incredible guitar player. His teaching style is as humorous as it is cerebral, and this book is an extension of that philosophy.

Some of the topics covered are playing on single or adjacent strings, intervals, open playing, position playing, triads, 7th chords, modes and chord scales, pentatonics, triads over bass notes. Although many of these topics are familiar ones, Mick covers them in a unique way, and those who don't have a firm grasp of the basic scales and chords used in jazz harmony might not get the most out of this book. A lot of it is Mick presenting ideas and exercises that might take you the rest of your life to master. The last part of the book is Mick's observations about playing, which are incredibly valuable.

Best line in the book: "One of the few things that's worth taking seriously is humor."
Suitable for advanced guitarists