DigiTech RP-300

Multi-Effects Floor Unit

Made by DigiTech

Description Digitech's newest effects processor. Features 40 factory presets and allows users to program 40 additional presets that are tailored to their taste.
Posted By Jerry Kretchmer
Directory Equipment: Effects
Rate/Review This Resource
Overall Rating: 4.1 (of 5)
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From 7 votes total

Member Reviews


On 1/23/2003, Gregory Wolff (572) posted:
Overall Rating:
This is just an incredible unit! I recommend it to anyone who wants to play guitar. it actually makes you sound better! It also allows you to find the sound you want, without buying numerous stomp boxes. It would be worth every penny to get another one if this broke or were lost or stolen.
Model Year: 2001
Price: $199.00 (new)
Where Obtained: World Music Supply
Features:
This unit has three foot swithes, an expression pedal, and five control knobs. It features 28 different effects which can be used up to twelve at a time. You can select from 12 different vintage and modern amplifier models and you can control your sound by choosing which type of cabinet your guitar will sound like. The effects are in stereo and this unit features the ability to play a CD or tape deck through the unit and record portions of the music to learn the song. There are too many different effects to describe here in detail, but I suggest you go to DigiTech's website and find out the details. You can create up to 40 of your own sounds very easily with this unit, or use one of the 40 factory preset sounds. The unit comes with an AC power supply.
Sound Quality:
I play this unit through a Marshall LR230, which is a very clean, stereo amp which can be used for small PA purposes. I have a custom made Wolffman Custom Deluxe electric guitar with solid maple body and neck, Carvin electronics and a Floyd Rose tremolo. I've had to reset my bridge pickups back away from the strings a bit, because the pickups were a little too hot for the sound I wanted and were creating their own distortion. I recommend if you use this unit, you use the cleanest possible sounding pick-ups, and let the effects processor create your sound. This unit would be excellent for any type of guitar playing style, from clean to country, from metal to meaty. There is almost no limit to the sounds you can create on this unit.
Ease of Use:
This unit is programmable and is extremely easy to edit your sounds. It took be about 30 seconds to figure out how to change my sound and about 30 more seconds to figure out how to save a sound. It took me longer to read the manual to find out what the different effects were, than it took to find the right sound. It takes almost no time at all to find the sound you want. All you have to do is choose between the different amp modeling features, set the gain and amp levels and then add different effects until you've found your sound. It is the easiest unit to use that I have found. One thing that I have found that is a bit annoying is the saving feature. The five control knobs set the EQ settings when you are not in edit mode. These EQ settings are also the settings that you save while in edit mode. When you save your sound, the unit will reset itself to the EQ settings that are currently on the control knobs, which can have a drastic effect on the sound. To get the sound that you saved, you have to click to another saved sound and back to your recently saved sound--this resets the EQ settings to those saved in the sound. (Sound complicated? When you use the unit you will understand) This is not really a problem when you are playing and selecting different saved sounds, because the unit will always reset to the EQ settings you desire, it is just a bit of a hassle when you are setting up different sounds.
Durability:
It seems to be durable enough to play on stage and travel. The unit feels fairly heavy, even thought he outer shell is plastic. Digitech has a pretty good reputation, so they don't make junk.
On 9/13/2002, Jesse Ortman (507) posted:
Overall Rating:
I chose it for the large amount of effects built in and the great cost.

If I had to buy it again, I would probably upgrade to something with even more features.

The drawback to PROGRAMMING your effects is you have to be down at floor level, or bring it up to a table, and then you can't use the expression pedal.

It would be nice to be able to program the whole thing with foot switches, instead of knobs.

You can pretty much plug and play with all the presets that come from the factory.

Overall your getting a LOT of nice things for your money on this one.
Price: $199.00 (new)
Where Obtained: Guitar Center
Features:
Layout is easy to figure out. The manual is good at teaching you how to use it. Unit comes with an AC power supply. One thing it DOESN'T have is an on/off switch. You either have to unplug it at the wall or unit. No battery power option. Wish list: Make the display area bigger or able to display more info at once. There is no 440 hz A tone to match your sound to when tuning. You just play a string and it displays a note with left and right arrows pointing either flat or sharp. You can't just tune to a known sound, its a silent tuner. (You can hear your guitar, but there is no tones to match up to) The expression pedal is awsome. You can set it to any effect, or set it to volume. There are some really nice amp models built in. They sound really good. You can also pipe in 10 seconds of CD music and loop it back at different speeds. This "learn a lick" feature is pretty nice for slowing down solos and not loosing tone or sound quality. It's only 10 seconds at a time though, and you have to loop the whole thing through to hear it again. no rewind or anything.
Sound Quality:
Ibanez/Gibson thru the RP-300 into the clean channel on a crate 40 watt amp. Mostly 80's 90's rock, some slow clean stuff. This unit has 40 presets, some are useless but there are a lot of cool ones to use right out of the box. There is room for 40 more user presets. The only other effects processor I have used is a zoom 9002. The Digitech sounds at least as good as the zoom. There are a LOT of controllable parameters, several of which I have no idea what they do. The tuner could be better. The built in drum sounds are ok to play along to. You get some standard beats, and can control the beat/min. There is no smart media card or anyway to load or save things in and out of the machine. (For example loading some new drum rhythms)
Ease of Use:
This unit is easy to program and store settings. Very easy to edit or change stuff on the fly. Each preset has A/B channel. Its basically layed out like a big grid. Each row and column let you choose a particular effect. Below each column you change the parameters with knobs.
Durability:
The RP-300 is a pretty solid feeling unit. The expression pedal has a decent range and a toggle switch built in to throw in 1 more effect. The A/B foot switches are a little close together and you can accidently hit 2 at once and bypass the unit or switch to another channel when you didnt want to.
On 1/3/2002, Jake Williams (117) posted:
Overall Rating:
The amount of options are good, the distorted sound is awful.
Price: $200.00 (new)
Where Obtained: Guitar Center
Features:
I hate this thing. It has every feature you could ever ask for, and the worst distorted sound I've ever heard.
Sound Quality:
I've got a great tone now with Zoom and Marshall, and I've heard that I could make it even better with a Digitech RP unit. Wrong. There are many trippy effects, but that will only get you so far. The distorted tone sounds like you are playing underwater, or that there is a piece of foam over your amp. It sounds muffled, weak, artificial, etc.
Ease of Use:
This takes untold hours of fiddling to get a good sound. I'm serious, the amount of options is vast, and it takes way too long to get through them. The RP claims to be able to give you a good sound without "wading through endless menus", but that is exactly what you have to do.
Durability:
It's sorta durable on the bottom, but all the knobs and stuff on top are cheap plastic.
On 11/4/2001, Chris Jacobson (329) posted:
Overall Rating:
The soung I get out of my amp is so good that I hate to mess with a good thing but I'll update this after I get more of a chance to play with it.
Model Year: 2001
Price: $199.00 (new)
Where Obtained: Mid-Michigan Music
Features:
AC powered, up & down switches to scroll through effects, Amp modeling A & B switch, stereo out, headphone jack, etc.
Sound Quality:
New American Series Strat and a Dearmond M-72 through a Marshall JCM2000 DSL 401. Through the headphones everything sounds very digital, I haven't really tinkered with it too much yet but it has a very trebly sound through the amp, most of the factory presets are crap and it's unfortunate that you can't change them, there are 40 of them and 40 user programmable patches. I tries it briefly theough the effects loop of my amp and it didn't work very well but again I haven't tweaked it much. I'll update this review at a later time but for now the sound quality isn't very good.
Ease of Use:
Fairly easy to use I guess, I don't care for the setup for gigging but again I'll update this.
Durability:
Looks pretty heavy duty.
On 9/8/2001, Jonah Chambers (717) posted:
Overall Rating:
An above average unit at an averange price. If it were to be stolen, I'd cry, and then look for something different. =)

This is a pretty good unit overall. If you decide to give it a chance, I don't think you'll be dissapointed.
Model Year: 2001
Price: $199.99 (new)
Where Obtained: The Music Store
Features:
First off I would like to state that when I give a product 4 stars, it is what a 5 would be to some people. The Good: -It has a Amp Channel foot switch, so you can have to amp models on one patch.... I've constructed a great blues patch that makes me sound very reminicent to the great SRV using the Blackface model for the first channel, and a cranked Tweed for that little extra overdrive for the B channel. Great feature. -On some effects and on some models it utilizes 5 knobs for editing, as opposed to the 3 on the the RP200 and RP100. Nothing overly exiting, but a nice extra. - V-Switch: This feature enables you to, if you push the toe of the expression pedal, insantly go in to wah mode. Cool feature. -Assignable Expression pedal. -Up/Down footswitches. -Back Lit 6 figure (I think) display. The Bad: Not really much bad really, but there are a few: -Footswitches too close together! Easy to accidentally go into bypass or phrase sampler. -My expression pedal is squeaking....but I'm thiking if I loosen the nut a bit it will solve this problem. -No on/off switch, you must unplug it in order to cut it off.
Sound Quality:
I'm useing an Essex Les Paul copy and a Fender M-80 (Solidstate) amp. I play blues, rock, and some other styles. Some of bands I like and am trying (I stress trying for some of these) Tool, Radiohead, Dream Theater, Staind, and others. This unit, I imagine, could fit almost anyone's style of music. This unit is a great step up from the rather sterile sounding ZOOM GFX-707 I had before. The sound and feel is very responsive to picking dynamics. I love it. Most models are pretty good, standouts being the Blackface, Stack, and Rectifier models. The rest I haven't really found a use for yet. The only poor model in my oppinion is the Acoutic model. Way too quiet and un-acoustic sounding for me. The effects are all pretty good, but I don't used them terribly much. The wah is OK, but not that great. The delays are great and expansive on this unit, as are the reverbs.
Ease of Use:
It's pretty easy to work with this unit right out of the box. The buttons are rather small, but any bigger would be gaudy (Sp?).
On 5/5/2001, Mark Chaney (172) posted:
Overall Rating:
I looked at everything. EVERYTHING. POD, BOSS, KORG, ZOOM, etc... For the money, this one won the battle, ease of use (knobs), and the number of productive features were the determining factors. I'd buy it again, but I still wish it had a more usable sampler and a little better chorus...also, you have to be careful "stomping" cause the foot pedals are a bit cramped. The only other thing that people should know about this unit is that I've heard some criticisms on it because you have to step through the presets in sequence...well the truth is that you have 2 channels per preset. This gives you fast access to six presets (the one you're on A/B, and the one above A/B, and the one below A/B). I can't imagine using more than 3 presets in a song anyway. So, if you set your unit wisely for your live set, you'll be fine. At home... who cares?
Model Year: 2001
Price: $199.00 (new)
Where Obtained: Guitar Center
Features:
3 buttons, 5 knobs, Pedal, AC Power, 40 presets, 30 Drum patterns, Stereo or Mono output. No Tubes. I give it a 4 on Features because I WISH it had a sampler other than the "learn a lick", because that sampler is only used by the line input, and not the guitar input.
Sound Quality:
I have a Marshall 1960 TV Reissue (Looking for a new head for it), a Peavey Backstage, and a 1970s Fender Princeton. I'm playing a Yamaha Fat Strat Copy, and waiting for my Fender "Fat" which I just purchased on Ebay. I've only used the RP Unit through the Princeton so far but the sound is very good overall. Some of the presets are SO CHEESEY that I got some laughs out of them, but others are very good, especially the straight distortions. I loved the "surf" preset...smile and play Wipeout. I wasn't too thrilled with the Chorus, and the decay of the reverbs/delays gets a bit pongy (You can REALLY hear it on headphones) when they are fairly wet. I like the Wah, Yah, and other effects just fine. It's not noisy, and I think that you could tweak this for any style of play. Compared to the MXR (Distortion +), DOD(Overdrive - Hated it), Boss(Distortion), and other Digitech boxes I've had, this one beats them for most situations. I'm gonna buy a Boss "Blue Tube" stomp box to throw in the chain to warm things up even more. I can't see needing more than that for any situation. (Maybe another chorus..)
Ease of Use:
Programmable... The best feature of this unit is that it uses Knobs! This is THE EASIEST multi-unit that I've ever seen to program and use. I created a pretty dry preset called BPunkd in about 5 minutes that sounds excellent. Oh, and NAMING your presets is way cool and easy to do...just turn the knobs.
Durability:
The RP-300 is heavy duty. It could probably endure a fairly good pop from my claw hammer, but I think I'll pass on testing it that way.
On 3/19/2001, Jerry Kretchmer posted:
Overall Rating:
Good for the money. I like Boss effect pedals, but I wanted an all-in-one type of deal, and am very happy with the RP300. I would definitley buy this unit again, and would recommend this product to others. If you're in the market for an effects proccesor, and don't want to spend a lot of cash...the RP300 may be for you!
Price: $219.00 (new)
Where Obtained: Woodwind and Brasswind
Features:
Features amp modeling, pickup simulator, compressor, EQ, noise gate, chorus, flanger, phaser, tremolo, vibrato, rotary (leslie-like), envelope filter, detune, pitch shift, whammy, delay, reverb, and wah. Also included is Digitech's own "Ya Ya and Synth Talk". There is also a rhythm trainer with 30 different drum patterns, with speeds to 40-240 bpm, a "Jam-a-long" feature, tuner and a "learn-a-lick" feature. This unit comes with an expression pedal and power supply. Dimensions are 8.5" L X 13" W X 2.25" H, 3.76 lbs. Not a bad little unit. Worth the money I paid for it. Some of the factory presets are really neat, and if you're like me, you'll play them for a few days before moving onward to editing your own effects. This unit is in no way "perfect". The "wah" isn't as good as a "Cry Baby", and the amp modeling rates at about fair, but for the money...this unit kicks butt.
Sound Quality:
I use a Fender Standard Fat Stratocaster and a Marshall DSL401. I usually play hard rock, punk based music. This unit does fine for this purpose, and it would be well suited for Jazz/Blues playing as well. This is my first unit, so I am unable to compare it with any other. The fellows at WWandBW told me it was about 100 steps up from the RP3 (discontinued)and they even let me plug it in a try it out before I bought it. The noise gate feature makes this unit exceptionally quiet. At least I haven't noticed anything other than the hum from my amp. Digitech's "Ya Ya" effect/preset is similar to a wah, and it sounds ok, but I don't think I'll use it that much, but their "Synth Talk" is pretty neat, and you can get some pretty funky riffs going on with it. The acoustic modeling doesn't sound all that great, and the chorus is so-so. I do like the triggered flanger and phaser effects. They are a bonus and makes up for the negative aspects.
Ease of Use:
As said before, this unit comes with 40 factory presets, and room for 40 more "user" presets. Programming is a little akward at first and takes some getting use to, but easy all in all.
Durability:
I'm not sure if I'd recommend this unit for live playing. The pedals are kind of too close together, and if you have 2 left feet like myself, you'll find yourself pressing both the first and middle one, "which puts it in bypass mode". And if you stick to playing with the factory presets, you'll have to keep shuffling up and/or down through all 40 of them until you get what you want. Digitech's been in this biz for years. They make good stuff. It's pretty heavy duty for the money.