Taylor 310

Acoustic 6-String Guitar

Made by Taylor

Description Standard issue '98 310. Solid Sapele sides and back, solid spruce top, mahogany neck, ebony fretboard, rosewood overlay on the headstock. Groover tuners with very simple appointments.
Posted By Todd Schliemann (81)
Directory Equipment: Guitars
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Overall Rating: 5.0 (of 5)
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Member Reviews


On 3/8/2005, Rick Halverson (119) posted:
Overall Rating:
Fender gibson ramiraz got insurance not sure the deep rich sound spend the extra 5 or 6 hundred dollars this is the purfect guitar for the beginer or pro
Model Year: 1998
Price: $1275.00 cdn. (new)
Where Obtained: steves music
Features:
U.s. mahogany 20 frets no controls natural finish
Playability:
Excellent
Sound Quality:
Classical/ jazz/ chet style fingering
Durability:
Yes so fsr never
On 3/19/2001, Nick Ahn posted:
Overall Rating:
I can say that if i somehow destroyed, lost or had my 310 stolen that i would go out and buy another one! I have nothing bad to say about this great guitar and it will always be my #1 best. I continually play with other Taylors, but none suit best to my 310. I am talking about pure quality for a really great price!
Price: $630.00
Where Obtained: eBay
Features:
Taylor Guitars has always been centred in the San Diego region and since 1992, has been located in the town of El Cajon. It is an 100%, all-American guitar company that emphasises quality over quantity. The Taylor 310, being the lowest model they sell, holds true to this mantra. It is a 6-string, dreadnought-body guitar, and has Sapele back/sides (Sapele is related to mahogany), mahogany neck, rosewood headstock inlay, ebony fretboard/bridge... They use real materials, not fake kinds. The 310 by default does not have electronics installed, but you can get it custom-installed from Taylor (they use Fishman and LR Baggs pickups), or you can always get one installed yourself. It has a satin finishreally classy! It has chrome-plated Grover tuners, and they help to keep the guitar in tune for a long time! Quality, quality, quality!
Playability:
The Taylor 310 is easy to play with (thanks to their easy action) and should not present problems with most guitarists.
Sound Quality:
The Taylor 310 is a dreadnought guitar, so it is usually best for heavy strumming and occassionally, fingering/picking. The Sapele wood is very warm-sounding and picks up real well in amps. I have a Fishman Natural I pickup installed on my 310, and the sound comes really well. Taylor does offer guitars with electronics already installed, but the sound is great whether you plug in or go "acoustic."
Durability:
As mentioned above, Taylor uses all-natural, all-solid wood in constructing their Taylors, so it will be subject to climate/humidity changes. That is the only liability of an all-solid wood guitar. Martins, Goodalls, Larrivees and other high-end acoustic makers are all subject to this as well, so Taylor is not alone. However, Taylors are made with extreme care and are durable. Their necks have been improved so that you won't need to adjust it so much. But, if you want to adjust your guitar, Taylor can set up your preferred action in less than five minutes! Concrete. Solid. Built-to-last. That's Taylor.
On 2/4/2001, Todd Schliemann (81) posted:
Overall Rating:
This is a standard work horse for me. It is better by far than anything in it's price range and I have come to depend on it. I don't need to baby it and it plays like silk. In this price range, it has no equal to any other acoustic for construction, finish, clarity and balance of sound, or smoothness from top end to low. It doesn't aspire in looks, but has the sound, and never stops me from making the music.
Model Year: 1998
Price: $800.00 (new)
Features:
This is a base-line Taylor. No flash, no electronics, no glitter, no gold, no exotic anything, nothing but well balanced sound, extremely well made, solid wood. The back and sides are satin finished Sapele, a version of mahogany that is more varigated than others. Top is solid gloss finished spruce, ebony fretboard, mahogany neck with rosewood overlay on the headstock. Grovers up top.
Playability:
Smooth as silk. Narrow neck with low action easily adjustable with the truss rod. Almost plays like an electric. Satin finished neck is thin but fast. Very flat section on the neck profile, flatter than say, Martin. Frets were nicely set and finished and have held up well over the two years I've had it. Taylors are known for their low action. Always expected to have to give some of it up over time, but that doesn't seem to be the case. Have adjusted the truss rod several times, to see what will happen but generally return to factory set. Even when I remove all the strings to get at the fretboard and bridge for cleaning she seems to return back nicely without too much trouble.
Sound Quality:
I generally play the Blues flatpick but drift in and out of fingerstyle. This guitar is brightish with a smooth low end. It is balanced, clear and has a brighter, but sharper lower end than, let's say Martin. The low end is warm, but not dark. High end is very clear and sharp and will stay that way (maybe even sharpen) when played hard. The low end gets a bit muddled when driven hard. It has good substain, harmonics, and overall has a very smooth balance. It has it's own character compared to other guitars, let's call it "simple sophistication." When you really drive it, it seems to favor a clean attack. Humidity changes do affect the sound. Dryer makes her sing clearly and the harmonics really work well, as most do, but here this guitar comes into it's own.
Durability:
I don't play out anymore, but wouldn't hesitate to use this guitar without back up. It is made very well, better than most of any price range, and has endured all my clumsy handling without worry. I don't baby it. I got it to be able to play whenever and wherever I wanted, something to get ideas down and make my music without worrying about recking the resail value. I rely on it to let me play and it always does.