Marshall VS30R

30W Combo (1 x 1")

Made by Marshall

Description Solid state amplifier/speaker combo that emulates the sound of a valve-driven amp. 30 watts with a 10" Marshall (Celestion) speaker. The amp has two channels, clean and overdrive.
Posted By Stan Blackburn (87)
Directory Equipment: Amplifiers
Rate/Review This Resource
Overall Rating: 4.7 (of 5)
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From 6 votes total

Member Reviews


On 8/11/2005, Chad Gerbe (1365) posted:
Overall Rating:
I would most definatley get this amp again if it is lost or stolen. i dont think i would need to add anything at all the make the amp better. very durable, has enough features to get the job done, overall its a very excellent amp for the guitarist on a budget!
Price: $130.00
Where Obtained: Guitars Plus, Wexford PA
Features:
It has enough features to get the job done. it does have a line out for recording use and a headphone jack.
Sound Quality:
Absolutly love the sound! on the clean channel it has a crisp, bluesy sound, and when overdriven it can really scream! and i dont use any effects for it at all.
Ease of Use:
Does not take much time at all to achieve an awesome sound!
Durability:
Its pretty sturdy, but i havent used it in a live setting yet. its solid-state, so you dont have to re-tube it.
On 6/18/2001, Dane Deasy (26) posted:
Overall Rating:
I am very satisfied with this amp. I am already in love with Marshall. With this as my first "nice" amp, I am very please and expect myself to keep purchasing Marshall amps. Incredible tones and sounds great at full volume.
Model Year: 2001
Price: $200.00 (new)
Where Obtained: George Kay's Music
Features:
Sound Quality:
Ease of Use:
Durability:
On 8/13/2000, Stephen Lee (147) posted:
Overall Rating:
Overall, i like this amp and its done very well for me. The price is great considering what you get. If it were stolen, i'd probably buy a more expensive model, for a bit more flexibility, including an effects loop. But despite a few niggles, its a great growl that this thing produces when cranked up, and thats why i bought it in the first place.
Model Year: 1999
Price: $195.00 Pounds, Sterling (new)
Where Obtained: Sound Control, Glasgow, UK
Features:
This is a two channel amplifier, with a spring reverb (single knob controls both channels). A footswitch was included to change channels. This is one of Marshall's attempts at tube-amp emulation, and is totally solid-state. Channel 1 (Clean) has volume, bass and treble controls, while channel 2 (Overdrive) has Gain, Bass, Contour, Treble and Volume knobs. A line out is provided, and a headphones socket. There is no effects loop, which has begun to irritate me recently. I suppose that not many amps in this price-range have a loop, so that's not too big a problem. For a practice amp at home, this has plenty of oomph, and even for smaller sessions at rehearsal rooms. I have found it to be a bit quiet on occasion when playing with a live drummer (everyone turns up, and this is allready at 10). I have played a gig with it, and its fine for that if its mic ed up and through the PA, but it wouldn'y have a hope on its own in even a small pub. So, overall this is a practice amp. It doesn't have a loop, or enough grunt for gigging situations, but this is a cheap practice amp, and for that i think it does pretty well.
Sound Quality:
I play a couple of 'super' strats with Floyd-rose trems into this amp. Effects are thin on the ground so-far, just a Dunlop cry-baby Wah (Wonderful!) and a Boss Chorus. I bought the amp for the distorted sound. Its tight and aggressive, and suits the industrial music i've been playing very well. For other purposes, its not so good. Subtlty is not this amps strong point, and it doesn't do a very good bluesy break-up sound. Just start at Crunch, then get nastier. The clean channel is fine, but nothing special. I always seem to have to stick some chorus on to getit sounding half-way respectable. As far as noise (the unwanted type), its very quiet, even at high gains.
Ease of Use:
Very simple to use.
Durability:
So far no problems at all with some pretty heavy use. It feels pretty sturdy, and solid-state is always going to be more reliable than tube.
On 7/29/2000, Matt Adams (227) posted:
Overall Rating:
Good amp for the price range. Its really loud i usually don't turn it past four. Really like the distortion, got a better sound out of this than i did out of a crate s.s. half stack and a fender 1/2 stack when i played them out a couple days ago. My next amp will probably be a head. If you like heavy music and dont have much cash get this or save up for somethin by line6
Model Year: 1999
Price: $250.00 (new)
Where Obtained: Guitar Center
Features:
2 channels, 30 watts, 10" speaker, solidstate lineout, footswitch
Sound Quality:
I use it with my ibanez rg270 no effects. I play stuff like Mxpx, Strungout, Sevendust, Soundgarden, etc. and this amp is pretty good for those styles. Nice distortion. i like it so much i'm considering buying a s.s. head instead of a tube. good beginner amp.
Ease of Use:
Pretty easy to get a good sound out of it. the contour knob takes alittle fiddling.
Durability:
ITS A MARSHALL. No problems yet
On 7/9/2000, Stan Blackburn (87) posted:
Overall Rating:
Overall, I am super satisfied with my VS30R. I was considering a Fender Princeton, Laney, Vox, and Crate, but it came to "brass tacks," there was no other choice -- Marshalls are the best out on the market. I would buy this amp again for one reason -- true quality tone. I suppose Marshall could improve the look of the amp. Maybe updating the appearnce of the amp would help marketing. But don't we buy Marshalls for their vintage appearnace? In closing, if you're looking for a powerful, quality sound, look no further than the Marshall VS30R (definately get the reverb; it's worth it).
Model Year: 2000
Price: $235.00 (new)
Where Obtained: Sam Ash
Features:
The overdrive controls are Gain, Volume, Bass, Contour(mids), and Treble. The Clean channel has a Volume, Bass and Treble control only. Reverb is applicable to the overdriven and clean sound. The amp has a footswitchable as well as push-button channel changing mechanism. The power, punch, and tone quality of this amp are unbelievable. From low to loud volumes the sound is great. This amp is perfect for the practice room and studio; it can even stand up to gigging at small clubs. The amp is solid state.
Sound Quality:
I use an Epi Les paul with DiMarzio DP100 and PAF pickups. Currently, I do not use any effects, but I will soon invest in an EQ to balnace out the highs and lows. I like to play rock, so the amp is able to perform well with high quality an varied sounds in the overdrive channel. The Valvestate electronics are noticeable in the tone quality, but the amp does not sound like an exact tube amp; instead, it sounds like a cross between a solid state and a tube amp. Marshalls are not know for their clean sound, and this amp holds up to that standard. If you want clean, then buy a Roland JC. Overall, the sound is high quality. Marshalls are second to none.
Ease of Use:
The amp is very easy to use. The knobs are standard marshall knobs that are clearly labled and perform their labled task. The input, line-out, and headphone jacks are easy to use and great to have for obvious reasons. This amp is about as easy to use as any Crate, Laney, or Boogie amp.
Durability:
Marshalls are tough black boxes. I use to own a Lead 12, and for ten years that amp never gave me a problem. I expect the same out of this one. Marshalls are known for their reliability and durability.