Epiphone Les Paul 90

Electric 6-String Guitar

Made by Epiphone

Description Solid body electric with two humbuckers, three way switch, 22 fret neck, fixed bridge, rosewood fingerboard, and alder body, the LP-90 is a special edition only available through Sam Ash.
Posted By Stan Blackburn (87)
Directory Equipment: Guitars
Rate/Review This Resource
Overall Rating: 4.0 (of 5)
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From 3 votes total

Member Reviews


On 11/27/2000, Brian Nentwick posted:
Overall Rating:
As I said, I really wanted an Epi Dot but as a recreational player (I'm picking up playing after a 13-14 year break)I couldn't justify spending the extra money. After looking it over I had pretty much convinced myself that it was actually an LP-100 (a much more expensive axe) with small cosemetic flaws. In fact, I pulled the model sticker off the end of the box and it said LP-100 underneath it. Therefore, I think this is an excellent value in a guitar. And as I said before, it felt like an old friend right from the start.
Price: $229.00 (new)
Where Obtained: Sam Ash
Features:
The prior description covers it, LP shape, dual humbuckers, carved top which gives it a nice look, all black with cream pickguard. This is also available in a sunburst. From what I can tell, the sunburst model looks exactly like the LP100 on the Epiphone site. I look at mine and I can see several small flaws in the finish (dings in the undelying wood). I think the LP90 is actually an LP100 "B-Stock"
Playability:
I was looking at this or a low end model Strat (Mexican not a Squier)for $299.00. I picked up this one and it just felt right. Like an old friend. The neck is comfortable, the action was quick. Chording was effortless, slides were smooth (the strat had really thick fretwire). I really wanted to get a Dot but it is beyond what I can justify spending at my level of playing ability and neccesity.
Sound Quality:
I have a Peavy Envoy 110 that I'm pumping this through. I've also played it through my instructors practice amps. I like the sound with the bridge pickup tone turned up and the neck pickup tone turned down. It gives it a clear, warm tone. I'm trying to learn jazz guitar so I think I will try some flatwounds on it. Everyone tells me that will give it an even warmer tone. I also crank it up once in a while to get some chunky distortion. Nice thick sound.
Durability:
Well, the one I bought needed a set-up right out of the box. I bought the Sam Ash extended warranty which gets me a free set up once a year for as long as I own the guitar. I figured it would need a set up once I settled on the right combo of strings. Everything seems to be holding up fine. I have only had it for about four months now. It stays in tune better than my instructors Strat and I'm taking my in and out of a warm house, cold car, warm house, cold car, warm house...you get the picture.
On 7/5/2000, Stan Blackburn (87) posted:
Overall Rating:
Overall, I reccommend this guitar to those on a budget who are willing to do the necessary modifications. I am thoroughly pleased to own a great LP with awesome sound (after mods)at a fraction of the price. If you have the money ($1000.00+), however, just get the Gibson. Epiphones are worthwhile, suitable substitues for Gibsons. Unlike Squire (or even the Mexican versions)of Fender, Epis play well and hold far better tone and craftsmanship.
Model Year: 2000
Price: $239.00 (new)
Where Obtained: Sam Ash
Features:
"Crafted" in Korea, this guitar has an alder body and maple bolt-on neck with rosewood fretboard. The guitar has 22 frets, six stings, two volume and two tone controls, three-way switch, two humbuckers, ebony laquer finish, fixed bridge, and Epiphone stock tuners and pickups.
Playability:
The action was set too high, so I lowered the bridge. The neck is a typical Les Paul neck -- fat and chunky with plenty of feel and tone. Compared to other guitars in its price range, the Epi LP-90 plays well. I was especially impressed by its tone and clarity when I tried it out through a Marshall VS100R. However, when at high volumes, the pickups squeal (low cost identifier), so I replaced the bridge with a DP100 and the neck with a PAF (DiMarzios). The tuners are not that bad, but I am going to replace them with Sperzel locking tuners to ensure tuning perfection. For the $110 in modifications I made on this guitar, it is as good as any $800-$1000 Gibsons I've played. Although the body is thinner than the standard LP, the tone is still good (not as rich and fat as a Gibson, but at 1/8th of the price, it is close enough).
Sound Quality:
I use a Marshall VS30R with no effects, and the guitar sings wonderfully. To get a decent clean sound, I feel you need the PAF in the neck, though. I enjoy Rock and Metal mainly and feel this guitar fits these genres effectively. The LP-90 is a fat sounding crunch guitar that is clearly on the "warm" Les Paul side of tone. The pickups, as on any guitar at this price range, are meant to be replaced to attain any sound above marginal at a moderate volume (above 3 on my Marshall).
Durability:
Very durable and reliable so far.