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Dude! What are you doing to that cat?

Hi folks, being a big Led Zepp fan i've just bought a violin bow to mess around with but i'm finding it very hard to raise a nice clean note with it, any suggestions? (other than where to stick my bow)
RT
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Re: Dude! What are you doing to that cat?

1/10/2001 7:15 AM

Bruce Maag (15581) wrote:

You really are a J. Page fan. I never tried that. But it sounds interesting. I'm afraid the way you worded your post. You will get some wild replies. But not from moi.

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Re: Dude! What are you doing to that cat?

1/10/2001 10:47 AM

Tim Floto (6151) wrote:

Jimmy Page talked about it in an interview in Guitar Player (or one of those magazines) probably a year or more ago. Mybe you can find that interview by searching the web.
Sticking that bow anywhere but across the strings brings tears to my eyes.

Tim, where the sun don't shine

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Re: Dude! What are you doing to that cat?

1/10/2001 11:11 AM

James Woods (2746) wrote:

Bow Suggestion.
John Long, a WN member and band mate of mine experimented with bowing a few years ago. Go to his page and pick his brain.

I do know that you need a guitar with a flat fretboard. That's why Les Pauls are better for bowing. I play strat's and tele's and the fret board surface on those has too much arc to make good contact on all of the strings whereas a Les Pauls has a really flat fretboard.

james

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Re: Dude! What are you doing to that cat?

1/10/2001 5:32 PM

John Bilicska (112) wrote:

No, no, no. What you want to *avoid* is a flat fretboard: that's why Jimmy usually used a tele with the bow back in the Yardbirds--the neck radius is more like the neck radius of a violin. You're not supposed to bow chords, no violinist can (they're always slightly arpeggiated). The arch is what makes bowing work, at least on a violin. Les Pauls are a poor choice for bowing, or for playing classic Led Zep for that matter--the first two albums and the solo for 'Stairway to Heaven' are all played on teles.

As for the original poster, I hope you bought some rosin for the bow. Rosin, made from tree resin, provides the friction necessary to start vibrating the string.

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Re: Dude! What are you doing to that cat?

1/10/2001 6:46 PM

Chuck Stensrud (13014) wrote:

Correctimundo. If the fretboard and strings are flat, IF you could keep the bow flat on all six strings at once, you would be able to play only the chords that use all six strings or the individual notes on either E string. In reality, you want to be able to play 1, 2, or 3 strings at a time (I believe on a strat with light strings, you could use just a tad extra bow pressure and hit 3 strings - yeah, yeah, I know the weight of the bow is all the pressure you are supposed to use).

%chuck%

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Re: Dude! What are you doing to that cat?

1/10/2001 9:25 PM

Bruce Maag (15581) wrote:

I can see the point of using a rounded fretboard for bowing. But I've seen Page bow an LP also. Evidently, he can bow both types of necks.

I'll never try it. It's pages original trick.

Besides, all I ever wanted was rosin all over my giz.

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Re: Dude! What are you doing to that cat?

1/11/2001 10:31 AM

James Woods (2746) wrote:

I stand corrected.

I was thinking of Page bowing chords and just assumed that's why he was bowing a Les Paul the night I saw him here in Atlanta. Also, my friend bowed on a flat fretboard and it sounded OK.

I have never tried it. Maybe I should have before I offered advice.

james



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Re: Dude! What are you doing to that cat?

1/12/2001 7:23 PM

Richard Templeton (136) wrote:

Bowing my Les Paul the problem hasn't realy been access to the strings but geting the note to sound. There is a violin shop 100yrds from my house so i'll get some of this rosin stuff to try, the other thing that occured to me was that the bow may need to be restrung, i got it second hand and it does seem to be easier to get a good, clean, constant note from certain places along the length of the bowstring than others, i wondered if it had worn too smooth maybe. The best results i've had with it came from playing my 5 string bass clean as a whisle staight into my amp, it gave a chelo like tone that i liked. The only video i've seen of Page playing with a bow he was using a les paul but he was beating the guitar with it more than bowing, you could see more hairs snap with every thump, i think by the time he was done it was more a stick than a bow (if anyone is interested i'll email the quicktime clip to them) I suppose if you didn't mind devoting a guitar to it you could raise the action on the centre strings on a strat type bride to give a violin type curve, but thats a little too much work for me. If anyone wants to try let me know how you get on. Thanks for the comments folks, next a theremin!
Richard.