Respond to This

Roman Numeral Chart

Does anyone have any idea what a roman numeral chart is ?
Responses
Respond to this

Re: Roman Numeral Chart

12/29/2012 1:14 AM

Adriano Parmiggianno (6926) wrote:

http://www.romannumerals.co.uk/roman-numerals/numerals-chart.html

Looking at the C major scale

I = 1 = C
ii = 2 = D
iii = 3 = E
IV = 4 = F
V = 5 = G
vi = 6 = A
vii = 7 = B

I, IV, and V are major chords.
ii, iii, and vi are minor chords.
vii is a diminished chord.




Respond to this

Re: Roman Numeral Chart

12/30/2012 3:41 AM

CBond None (143) wrote:

Kind of. The real use of the system is to assign function to each position within the scale. You did make the point of your example as being the “major” scale, good job on that . The numerals can be used for most scales. I kind of disqualify the Pentatonic and symmetric scales (ie. chromatic, diminished, whole tone etc.) And even commonly used scales when examined individually like the Harmonic Minor which can get pretty far out harmonically.

That’s why we kind of use the main minors scales in a potpourri. For example most Jazz players esp., not all look at the Minor key
i ii (m7b5) iii(aug) iv v7 VI VII7. A true hodgepodge of the Narural, Melodic and Harmonic minor combined, thus giving the reason for even having the minor key, yes, those beautiful options, at least to kind of guide us through the darkness when we get turned around a little bit :0



Respond to this

Re: Roman Numeral Chart

12/31/2012 2:06 AM

Stephen Polito (608) wrote:

oh yea me too.

Respond to this

Re: Roman Numeral Chart

12/30/2012 11:39 AM

Randy Hano (12149) wrote:

From Classical to Modern harmony the Roman Numerals all represented the position of the harmony in regards to the scale structure tone. Capital Letters represent major chords and lower case representing minor chords. You alter the chords by adding suffixes such as 7, 9, b13 for modern harmony or 6, 4/3, +6 for Classical.

The scale structure determine how the harmony or chord structure is defined by traditional stacking thirds upon each other.

Example:
Major Scale

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8

Stacking thirds using scale tones to create triads,

I = 1, 3, 5
ii = 2, 4, 6
iii = 3, 5, 7
IV = 4, 6, 1
V = 5, 7, 2
vi = 6, 1, 3
vii (dim5) = 7, 2, 4

Please also note that in the Nashville Notation system, stand numerals are used for chord stuctures instead of Roman Numerals.

Respond to this

Re: Roman Numeral Chart

12/31/2012 2:03 AM

Stephen Polito (608) wrote:

So Jazz there is no rules. Just a Basis...is that correct?



Respond to this

Re: Roman Numeral Chart

12/31/2012 9:49 AM

Randy Hano (12149) wrote:

Jazz is modern harmony with tons of rules unless you get into freeform where you have "just a basis" and that basis is what the artist decides eg: Ornette Coleman.

Jazz has a lot structure, it just that the harmony moves a lot quicker than rock music and the key centers can change in two beats or even quicker.





Respond to this

Re: Roman Numeral Chart

12/31/2012 3:02 PM

Stephen Polito (608) wrote:

Cool, Thank You. I am always learning. I know what you are saying. Keep those fingers moving as your picking that scale. While making the chords . I think .





Respond to this

Re: Roman Numeral Chart

1/2/2013 10:27 AM

Randy Hano (12149) wrote:

Stephen, try working on chord tones instead of scales. It will be easier to connect. With that said, start working on your arpeggio forms.





Respond to this

Re: Roman Numeral Chart

1/2/2013 5:14 PM

Stephen Polito (608) wrote:

Randy:
I am sill learning the taught forum on all the arpeggios. Also my Chord progress is still weak. I went to school for a couple years for music(minor). The books helped and inpired me alot for improvement. I have a few jazz books on order, which I am really looking forward to reading( Berkely) There were also a few private teachers that helped me along the way. For instance i now now a diatonic arpeggio scale. I would not have known that from schooling or by ear. To make along story short, I am always looking for more information on Chord Charts and Arpeggios. If there is anything else I can improve on I would be grateful to obtain the knowledge. Is there any other books I could order or information I can research?
Thank You,
Stephen





Respond to this

Re: Roman Numeral Chart

1/3/2013 11:03 AM

Randy Hano (12149) wrote:

Stephen - Do you own a Real Book? If not, get one.

As for arpeggio's, I really don't know of a good book as I am a stubborn mule. Why? I like to write my own stuff out. It helps me to see the fretboard better and understand placement of the notes. Plus the self education is priceless.

If you want to take this course, start with basic triads. Take your block barre chords and break them down to just triads
1, 3, 5
3, 5. 1
5, 1, 3

Do these for Major, minor, dim, aug.

Work the arpeggio in 3 string, 2 string and even 1 string. That should keep you busy for a while.





Respond to this

Re: Roman Numeral Chart

1/3/2013 2:14 PM

Stephen Polito (608) wrote:

Randy:

What is the degrees in the major scale for Major, Minor, Augmented, and Diminished?
What kind of Real Books are there?





Respond to this

Re: Roman Numeral Chart

1/3/2013 5:12 PM

Randy Hano (12149) wrote:

Root, 3rd, 5th or 1, 3, 5

From Wikipedia:
"The Real Book can refer to any of a number of popular compilations of lead sheets for jazz tunes, but is generally used to refer to Volume 1 of an underground series of books transcribed and collated by students at Berklee College of Music during the 1970s"

Basically a collection of standard jazz tunes played.

http://www.amazon.com/The-Real-Book-Sixth-Edition/dp/0634060384#_

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41XypTNldNL.jpg



Respond to this

Re: Roman Numeral Chart

1/3/2013 3:21 PM

Inactive Member wrote:

Be-Bop is more scale oriented, where as modal jazz changes based upon the modes that are played along with the chord substitution.

Free Jazz has no rules... kind of ;)

Respond to this

Re: Roman Numeral Chart

12/31/2012 2:11 AM

Stephen Polito (608) wrote:

Then all music would sound the same. There wouldnt be much variation. I dont really analyze it. Although analysis could come in handy. When I play a melody or harmony. I just put like 4 , 5 , 5 , 4/7/1 (chords) 1,1,1,1,1 ,2,1,2,1,3,1,1,3,2,3,3/5/6(13) 4, b5, b6,6 , octave. and so on .With a whole bunch of eighth and sixteenth notes! Anyways classic and jazz theory is fascinating. Would you be so kind to tell me where I could learn this stuff. In books or on line lessons.

Thank You

Respond to this

Re: Roman Numeral Chart

12/31/2012 7:12 AM

CBond None (143) wrote:

“Then all music would sound the same” Well, it does. Within most genre it does.



Respond to this

Re: Roman Numeral Chart

12/31/2012 10:02 AM

Randy Hano (12149) wrote:

Nice CB!

Respond to this

Re: Roman Numeral Chart

12/31/2012 10:01 AM

Randy Hano (12149) wrote:

I can't help with on-line lessons as I learned mine the traditional way, in school.

However Berklee makes a great series on music theory if you so want to dive in. Books 1 and 2 cover

http://www.amazon.com/Berklee-Music-Theory-Book-2nd/dp/0876391102/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1356965535&sr=1-1&keywords=berklee+music+theory#_

http://www.amazon.com/Berklee-Music-Theory-Book-2nd/dp/0876391110/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1356965535&sr=1-2&keywords=berklee+music+theory#_

Norman Brown shared this book with me back in 1989. One of the best books I ever owned and have not gone through it completely yet - I get sidetracked. But if gave me a whole new concept to things - please consider that I already had a pretty good background in theory and this book is not for the beginner.

http://www.amazon.com/Jazz-Language-Theory-Composition-Improvisation/dp/0760400148/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1356965954&sr=1-1&keywords=the+jazz+language

Respond to this

Re: Roman Numeral Chart

1/4/2013 7:18 AM

Mike Oppenheim (931) wrote:

If you're still having questions about roman numerals, root, 3rd, 5th, 7th, and calculating key signatures, I recommend "New Perspectives on Music Theory" by Charles Van Riper. It's an easy book to read, it's appropriate for beginners, and it makes the concepts of major and minor scales, key signatures, and chord spelling very clear. It was the first book I read for theory fundamentals, over 10 years ago, and I still recommend it.

http://www.amazon.com/New-Perspectives-In-Music-Theory/dp/1878398326