Respond to This

Developing Faster Chops

For a long time I relied on legato to do the job, but I began to see the limitations legato has compared to playing a tremelo shred style...

Anyway, I feel as if my right hand is a little retarded. I just can't seem to turn it into a "motor." I can get to only like 115bpm using a loose hand. I can go much higher using a stiff wrist and mostly arm, but it's tough to do when playing multiple strings.

Does anyone here have any essential tips for developing that loose motor hand... besides "just relax?" Or has any idea in particular helped you develop your chops when playing tremelo style on multiple strings?
Responses  [ Pages: 1 · 2 ]
Respond to this

Re: Developing Faster Chops

12/7/2006 2:23 PM

Inactive Member wrote:

First take it at a slower tempo to concentrate on
accuracy. Then gradually speed it up. This takes time.

Robert

Respond to this

Re: Developing Faster Chops

12/7/2006 3:27 PM

Michael Warner (774) wrote:

My tremelo technique also comes from the arm where my wrist is locked, but there is some finger movement that helps with the multiple strings. I used to try to play using just my fingers like yngwie but i just couldn't get the speed. The full arm movement brought my speed up but the finger technique helped with the string switches and even string skipping.
After your warmed up and your playing fast pretty clean then try to use some alternate picking with your fingers along with your arm.
It helped me, Mike



Respond to this

Re: Developing Faster Chops

12/7/2006 5:04 PM

Andy Wood (5136) wrote:

Are you referring to actual finger strokes from your right hand? If so, I think you might be describing anothor technique altogether - that of "hybrid picking" - a mixture of flatpicking and finger picking with the other remaining fingers.

Jason is asking about where the movement comes from when aiming for speed: either the wrist for speeds up to 115bpm (16th notes) and from the elbow beyond that. Many players find that to be the case. I have found that over the years, I can go more and more from the wrist before I have to resort to the elbow - up to around 175-180 these days. It's still developing beyond that over time - depends on the day really. It's a question of relaxation believe it or not. I find that the more relaxed my technique, the speed follows. Patience and gradual metronome work will increase your speed.

Andy



Respond to this

Re: Developing Faster Chops

12/7/2006 6:26 PM

Michael Warner (774) wrote:

I was simply describing my technique, if you wish to label it as hybrid it makes no difference to me.
As far as I'm concerned it's whatever works, so experimenting and trying different things and techniques can only make you better which is part of what he was asking.
It also seems that jason already had the "just Relax" advice, so my best advice would be to "Try Everything" and find what works best for you Jason.
Practice, Practice, Practice!!!!
Mike



Respond to this

Re: Developing Faster Chops

12/8/2006 7:57 AM

Andy Wood (5136) wrote:

Michael, you have completely missed the point. It's not the naming of your technique that was the important point - it's the fact that you have missed the intent of Jason's question. He was quite specific in saying he wanted to know whether he should be achieve fast picking with the wrist or from the elbow - you described something completely different. Your technique is known as hybrid, but that's irrelevant. What is relevant is that this style (whatever you call it) doesn't address the issue at hand. ie. it won't actually produce the extremely rapid picking Jason desires.

Rather than acting defensively, I think it would be more helpful to try and understand what I was saying. You seem to regularly take exception to my posts. I'm not sure why. I do take the time to listen to what you say and evaluate it on the basis of whether it meets the needs of the problem at hand. In this case it didn't.



Respond to this

Re: Developing Faster Chops

12/8/2006 10:31 AM

Michael Warner (774) wrote:

Missed the point?
Does anyone here have any essential tips for developing that loose motor hand... besides "just relax?" Or has any idea in particular helped you develop your chops when playing tremelo style on multiple strings?
I think thats pretty much what I was addressing by desribing my technique in hopes that it would be useful to him.
I try to give advice on what I know and works for me from actually playing the guitar rather than spew the same nonsense that you can read in any lesson book.
And how can you say something won't work? Different things work for different people and thats my point, rather than follow some preconcieved notion of do's and dont's just try everything.
Just shut up and play the guitar instead of sitting in theoretical crap soup.
I know the theory, technical terms and all that other stuff, now I just play guitar.
Anytime you want to jam I'm in Jim's livejam room all the time so stop in and we'll cut some heads.
Mike



Respond to this

Re: Developing Faster Chops

12/8/2006 10:42 AM

Michael Warner (774) wrote:

Oh, and no I am not using my fingers, it's stricly pick work.
What I was trying to describe was the use of alternate picking stemming from just the up and down movement of the fingers.
If you watch Yngwie's picking hand it comes from his fingers with very limited arm and wrist movement. I've tried doing this with limited success but the combination of arm and fingers has improved my speed and shred (220+ bpm).
Keeping a open mind and trying different techniques until you find what works for you, thats called learning.
Mike

Respond to this

Re: Developing Faster Chops

12/8/2006 6:46 AM

Christian Miller (1937) wrote:

I think the secret of fast playing is not to think of it as being fast. There is not fast in music - fast means rushing. Think instead of subdividing the beat.

I was listening ot Allan Holdsworth the other day and the thing that struck me was how regular his time is - his semiquavers (16th notes) are, for example, really even.

I think the timing aspect of playing is often overlooked, but when you boil it down there are really only two aspects to playing the guitar- the intervals (making sure they are clean) and the time (making sure they are exactly on the beat and not rushed or dragged, at least at first)

Teh problem with thinking of things as a technqiue is that you can get caught up in the physical problem of making it happen without thinking about the other aspects. The point of practicing against a metronome, for example, is to hear the subdivisions clearly. If you can hear four evenly spaced notes for every click at 60 bpm, how will you hear them at 120 or 200?

The technical aspect of playing is really to do minimal work and ensure that the hands are relaxed and that you aren't bending the wrists or anything else likely to encourage injury.

While we could argue about the relative merits of specialising in say economy/sweep picking(Gambale), left hand ligado (Satriani, say), pure hammer technique (Holdsworth) or alternate picking (Al Di Meola) or just learning everything I think players should do what feels natural, and concentrate on the sound. As long as you are relaxed and playing in time, speed will come naturally.



Respond to this

Re: Developing Faster Chops

12/8/2006 11:27 AM

Joe Vysok (459) wrote:

Very clear Christian! :) Alan Holdsworth is famous. I read an interview with him and he told that he ever wanted to play saxophone, but his parents refused him to do it and they bought him the guitar so he tried to play saxophone solos and parts on the guitar and that helped him to achieve his speed.

Another way is what Marcus Deml wrote in Errorhead Workshop for Muzikus(Czech musical magazine). Here is an example. Just practice it with metronome, choose another scale and try it with it. It helped me very much.

896846-10196527.jpg

Joe



Respond to this

Re: Developing Faster Chops

12/8/2006 12:57 PM

Joe Vysok (459) wrote:

As you see, he uses D dorian. He also uses D minor because Bb sounds more jazzy than B over D dorian chords - Dm7, Em7, Fmaj7, G7, Am7, Bm7b5 and Cmaj7. Just try it!

Joe

More Responses  [ Pages: 1 · 2 ]