Respond to This

Frank Gambale & Jazz-Rock Fusion + Thoughts on theory + S.O.S.

Saw the late Frank Gambale perform with Class the other night. First time I'd seen him play.

I gave up on learning Jazz music for a long time and just focused on Rock, but now I'm starting to get inspired to study again. Man Gambale's runs and "monster licks" are breathtaking. Gives me a lot of ideas for a Rock/Alternative and Jazz hybrid. Since Alternative music has become so diverse with fused styles, it seems about time Jazz made its way in.

...On another note, I've been trying to get my study on again, but it's frustrating. The more you learn, the more you realize you don't know.

So I ask this, what theory is useless and a waste of time? It seems I've spent countless hours learning exotic scales and what not, memorizing intervals of modes..., but it's frustrating because it doesn't necessarily make a difference in my playing. It seems the goal of having adept creative freedom is far far away.

So, what's the point in learning every last bit of theory? Or is there no point? Because I don't know exactly why I even want to study some things. I just do it anyway. Frustration is killing me...

Responses
Respond to this

Re: Frank Gambale & Jazz-Rock Fusion + Thoughts on theory + S.O.S.

11/12/2006 4:16 PM

Craig Lindsey (5518) wrote:

Music should help you fly, brother. It is a medium by which dreams are given brief life. If theory can help you achieve that, great...and I am of the belief that at least a modicum of theory DOES help get one off the ground.

But be careful that you don't turn into the NASA rocket scientist that loves the idea of space travel, but will be forever mired in mission control responsibilities, instead of actually getting to make the trip; mired in the muck of details.

Play from the heart. Play what you hear in your head when you wake in the middle of the night. Sometimes, sure, it matters why you play what you play, or think, and you hear the major 7ths and scales you've practiced, but on the best of days, you play what you would hum. And the only goal of theory, is to help you play what you hum...but it (theory) can become an end in itself, ultimately unsatisfying.

Just learn how to find quickly the notes you want to express. How ya do that is up to you...just my 2 cents.

Good luck...I liked Gambale also, saw him live..
Craig

Respond to this

Re: Frank Gambale & Jazz-Rock Fusion + Thoughts on theory + S.O.S.

11/12/2006 7:42 PM

Andy Wood (5136) wrote:

Hey Jason,

what's with the "late" Frank Gambale? I didn't know he had passed away, and as good as he is, I didn't think his licks could reach us from beyond the grave......



Respond to this

Re: Frank Gambale & Jazz-Rock Fusion + Thoughts on theory + S.O.S.

11/13/2006 12:48 PM

Marc Miller (1059) wrote:

concert started 5 mins late.............peace maddog



Respond to this

Re: Frank Gambale & Jazz-Rock Fusion + Thoughts on theory + S.O.S.

11/13/2006 1:05 PM

Bob Kent (10857) wrote:

What's up Dog? Off track here, but...

...my buddy Jimmy went to see Primus this past weekend. Said he payed nearly $60.00 a ticket. They played one set, just a few minutes over an hour long.

He was flippin'! He said everyone was p&$$$@!

Best of days to ya,

B Kent



Respond to this

Re: Frank Gambale & Jazz-Rock Fusion + Thoughts on theory + S.O.S.

11/14/2006 9:36 AM

Marc Miller (1059) wrote:

i'm gonna respond to this with a new question,,,i know what you mean lets see what others say....peace maddog

Respond to this

Re: Frank Gambale & Jazz-Rock Fusion + Thoughts on theory + S.O.

11/13/2006 1:18 PM

Vlatko Mirceski (3246) wrote:

...but now I'm starting to get inspired to study again

That's jazz, bro. You have to turn the raw practice aside and try to feel the music more. When you listen to somethig that inspires you, you're eager to grab the guitar and play. But than you stuck with some excersizes that kill your inspiration. It's a common thing.

It's useless to memorize a scale or mode without feeling its character. Explore one scale at a time and feel the intervals and the moving between notes. When you experience the scale, than you've learned it, not when you've memorized it.

Vlatko.

Respond to this

Re: Frank Gambale & Jazz-Rock Fusion + Thoughts on theory + S.O.S.

11/14/2006 12:30 PM

Will Kriski (169) wrote:

Good question Jason. I studied jazz for 2 years in college (after 25 years of playing rock and blues) and was extremely frustrated with all the theory and scales/exercises. My take is that it's better to learn a lot of melodic 'cells' or small motifs and learn how to combine them in a melodic/rhythmic way. These cells can also come from transcribing solos of great players (ie. don't just learn ii-V-I licks for example). I'm working on writing articles/books on this, so if you're interested drop me a line.

Respond to this

Re: Frank Gambale & Jazz-Rock Fusion + Thoughts on theory + S.O.

11/14/2006 4:34 PM

Jim Heidinger (8553) wrote:

Seems like all you have to do is to practice improvising. Scales, theory and what have you is essential to becoming familiar with the instrument.

You still have to practice improvisation skills to get anywhere if you want to become a soloist. No way around that... There is a lot of trial and error in this step to learning. Eventually you learn to hear what sounds good and execute those sounds on the instrument.

Jim

Respond to this

Re: Frank Gambale & Jazz-Rock Fusion + Thoughts on theory + S.O.S.

11/18/2006 11:58 AM

Jason Parker (2612) wrote:

Thanks for all the replies. Mucho appreciated.

Yes, the late Frank Gambale came to me in a dream and performed "Dangerous Curves." Just for me. It was amazing... No really. I just meant that I have one of his instructional videos where he's young, and it has a clip of him playing in much later years.

Great advice all around.

Primus... I've been wanting to see them for a long time. They're great. Ever hear Oysterhead? Les Claypool, guitarist from Phish, and drummer from the Police... Pretty far out.

Thanks again. Later.