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Lesson #10772 - Blues Soloing

For the IV chord which is A7, this gives us (relative to A), the root (A), 2nd (B), 4th (D), 5th (E) and minor 7th (G)

A nicely done lesson but the only thing that jumps out at me is without a 3 rd of a c over your A7(IV) chord, giving the minor interval, the notes used seem more a mix between A mixolydian and A major pentatonic or A dorian.

E minor relative is G major.

Maybe I'm just being picky but this shows the difficulties that come about by trying to use one scale over an entire progression. Don't mean to insult your intelligence, just some friendly criticism.
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Re: Lesson #10772 - Blues Soloing

4/28/2006 12:24 PM

Will Kriski (169) wrote:

Thanks for your response Robert. We are both correct actually. I will be leading students in subsequent lessons towards adding chord tones (the C# as you correctly point out). In the blues you can actually use the minor 3rd (C) over the A7 chord - since I've been studying jazz at college this is referred technically as the #9 interval and works over a dominant chord. I'm not suggesting students use only the pentatonic scale over a blues progression but it can work for periods of time (as my solo hopefully indicates) and it's a good way to start learning how to solo without having too many options at first. Thanks for your input though. I will add some more explanation to my lesson.

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Re: Lesson #10772 - Blues Soloing

4/28/2006 2:02 PM

Rick Kelly (2659) wrote:

Excuse me for chiming in, but I'm glad you're referring to the C note as a #9 for the A7 chord. I think this is a much more useful way to explain it than some strange, modal scale alteration.

However, it is usually bent a bit to make the "blue" note, or used as a passing tone into the 3rd, followed by the 5th or root to produce some common bluesy phrases.

Peace,
Rick

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Re: Lesson #10772 - Blues Soloing

4/29/2006 2:00 PM

Will Kriski (169) wrote:

Thanks Rick,
I agree with you - I actually use a combination of blues with other notes (chord tones, etc) as you mention. For this lesson I just wanted to focus on the minor pentatonic so that it's not too overwhelming (just with 5 notes). At times in soloing (rock, jazz, blues) you can decide just to use pentatonics on their own for a period of time in a solo. But I agree that there are other interesting note choices to make besides just the pentatonic notes.
I'm going to change the lesson name to minor pentatonic scale over blues progressions or something, to indicate the specific aspect of what I'm trying to teach.