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Requesting voicings for 7#5 chord

Hi Folks anyone have any other movable voicings for the 7#5. I only know two(below) but could use a few more.
They are quite elusive in the chord books.
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Re: Requesting voicings for 7#5 chord

1/30/2006 12:01 PM

Brian Elzey (4318) wrote:

Here are some more for you, in G:






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Re: Requesting voicings for 7#5 chord

1/30/2006 9:10 PM

Wilfred Bustar (865) wrote:

Oh yes, I use that first one alot-thanks. Sure are lots.

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Re: Requesting voicings for 7#5 chord

1/30/2006 12:17 PM

Andy Wood (5136) wrote:


Hey Wilfred, Here are a couple of shapes for you. They are all pretty comfortable to play with root notes on various strings:

root 5
root 2

root 6
root 3

root 4

root 1



Andy



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Re: Requesting voicings for 7#5 chord

1/30/2006 9:11 PM

Wilfred Bustar (865) wrote:

Ithanks very much Andy-I think I may...

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Re: Requesting voicings for 7#5 chord

1/30/2006 3:06 PM

Adriano Parmiggianno (6926) wrote:

Here's a few more
D7 #5
D7 #5
D7 #5



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Re: Requesting voicings for 7#5 chord

1/30/2006 9:15 PM

Wilfred Bustar (865) wrote:

Thanks AP, Well that does it now I know I have...opened the 7#5, can of worms--thanks everybody. I used variation quite a bit over the years but didnt know what it was. This is one cool sound when used in the proper context.
Thanks again this ought to keep me busy-: )
W

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Re: Requesting voicings for 7#5 chord

1/31/2006 6:17 AM

Jon Riley (9697) wrote:

Extra info if you're interested (or don't know it):

If you add a 9th to that chord (9#5), you get an interestingly ambiguous chord, which suggests the wholetone scale:
C9#5 = C-E-G#-Bb-D.
C9#5
Wholetone scale = C-D-E-F#-G-Bb
C wholetone

But because it's symmetrical, any note can be the root. The "C wholetone" scale is also the D, E F#, G# and Bb wholetone scales.
IOW, there are only two different wholetone scales (and they have one mode apiece!)

The corollary of this is that there are only two wholetone chords.

C9#5 (as shown) is also:

D9#5#11 (no 3rd)
E7#5#11
G#9#5#11 (no 7th)
Bb9b5
F#9#5#11 (rootless)

The other 6-name wholetone chord is one fret away from any of these.

Wholetone chords are actually difficult to use because of this ambiguity. Wayne Shorter used a wholetone chord in "Juju", and McCoy Tyner's piano riff for this tune was adapted by Stevie Wonder for "You are the sunshine of my life":
  G7#5 (G wholetone)
e|----------------|1-3---5-7---7-----------
B|-------0---2-4--|2-4---6-8---8-----------
G|-0---2-0---2-4--|-------------------------
D|-1---3----------|--------------------------
A|----------------|-------------------------
E|----------------|-------------------------

(resolves to Cmaj7)
This is the only usage of wholetone scale in popular music that I'm aware of.
(If anyone else knows another, I'd love to know!)


The plain 7#5 chord, OTOH, could well take the altered scale - with a #11, but also a b9 and #9:

C altered = C-Db-D#-E-F#-G#-Bb



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Re: Requesting voicings for 7#5 chord

1/31/2006 7:27 AM

Christian Miller (1937) wrote:

Jonny Greenwood's guitar solo on 'Paranoid Android' uses the whole tone scale (if I remember correctly.)

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Re: Requesting voicings for 7#5 chord

1/31/2006 7:33 AM

Christian Miller (1937) wrote:


I like these particularly because of the wholetone clash

F7#5
C7#5
(as you had it)

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Re: Requesting voicings for 7#5 chord

2/6/2006 9:52 AM

Chris Adams (440) wrote:

One way to generate a lot of interesting voicings is to
look at the 7+5 as a triad over a bass note. So, for G7+
5, you could try D#+/G or F+/G, say. Try the triads
close, then spread. Variations on F7/G would do it, too.
As a triad over bass note thing, you could try maybe
Adim/G.

In a band context, I would likely leave the bass note out
and just play an aug triad, or maybe just B, D#, and F in
some combination for G7+5.