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LEARNING BLUES LEAD

Okay, I can put together some blue's progressions and play em okay, and I have a ton of blues licks I've gotten off the net, but what I want to do is learn the blue's the way it's suppose to be played, felt and not read from tabs...so I thought the best way to do this would be to learn a scale or two by heart, and this guy gave me a scale which he says has all the key note's I'll need for soloing in key of A.
He said the scale was the A Pentatonic with added blues notes and some sharp notes added as well and I have been practicing with this scale and have a large part of it learned...but I would like to know or hear from someone with more experience then myself on your feelings about the scale he gave me, and if I should continue with it or be learning something else.

E---2--3---5--7---8---9--10---11---12---14--15--17
B--1--2--3--4--5--7--8--10--12--13--14--15--16--17
G--2--4--5--6--7--8--9--11--12--14--16--17--
D--1--2--4--5--7--9--10--11--12--13--14--16--17
A--2--3--4--5--6--7--9--10--12--14--15--16--17--
E--2--3--5--7--8--9--10--11--12--14--15--17--

I've been playing guitar now for about a year, and I guess I should have been working on scales long before this...but any imput will be most helpful...

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Re: LEARNING BLUES LEAD

10/29/2005 7:52 PM

Robert Chiefari (5087) wrote:

J.R.,

Not really sure what your showing us there...

But a simplistic lesson in the A minor pent for rock and blues. For blues - you just fill in alot of the half step notes of the A min pent scale (not really a scale - just 5 notes played over and over)

I'll attach a mp3 of me playing in A. The notes I'll use are basically these;




I'll play some variations using the notes. You'll hear where I play alot of notes (and bends) in between the actual 5 notes of the scale- it's really all up to you on the variations of the notes...
A_pent_blues.mp3


This is just a start of course, but hopefully will help you out some.

Cheers,

-Bob



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Re: LEARNING BLUES LEAD

10/30/2005 5:40 AM

J.R. Libby (219) wrote:

I know I could have put that scale down better, but the numbers are where you would fret each note in that scale, such as the high E,2 means fret the 2nd fret, 3 for the 3rd fret, and so on. The guy said it was an A pentatonic scale with blues notes added along with some sharp notes and was perfect for learning to solo in the blues?? That's all I know about it.

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Re: LEARNING BLUES LEAD

10/30/2005 5:47 AM

Jon Riley (9697) wrote:

That "scale" is a mixture of A blues scale and A mixolydian mode.
This is indeed what many blues players would use (the total set of notes they would draw from in the key of A), but it may be a little confusing unless you can see the chord shapes within it. or break it down.

First, here are the two scales separated:

A BLUES SCALE (minor pent with added b5)
E 0-----3---5-----8---10-11-12
B -1---3-4-5-----8---10------
G 0---2-----5---7-8-9-------12
D 0-1-2-----5---7-----10----12
A 0-----3---5-6-7-----10----12
E 0-----3---5-----8---10-11-12
.
A MIXOLYDIAN MODE (D major scale, or A major with b7)
E 0---2-3---5---7---9-10----12
B 0---2-3---5---7-8---10----12
G 0---2---4---6-7---9----11-12
D 0---2---4-5---7---9----11-12
A 0---2---4-5---7---9-10----12
E 0---2-3---5---7---9-10----12

I recommend you play around with each separate scale (over an A or A7 chord) to hear the differences.
Notes can be bent too (esp in the blues scale).

The A blues scale will work over all 3 chords in an A blues (esp if you bend notes here and there), but A mixolydian won't.

Listen to as much blues as you can (esp the old original stuff) to get a feel for the phrasing - the kinds of ways they put notes together, how they bend, etc.

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Re: LEARNING BLUES LEAD

10/31/2005 12:47 PM

Peter Kiley (890) wrote:

Learn your scales... cold.... then listen to and imitate the masters, B.B. King, Albert King, Muddy Waters, Buddy Guy, S.R.V, Clapton etc... they are the kings for a reason

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Re: LEARNING BLUES LEAD

11/2/2005 7:04 PM

Joshua Stickel (74) wrote:

well j.r. i have a slightly less technical approach to blues soloing i've been playing for about a decade now and i still can't read sheet music and have the hardest times with tabs so heres my take on it, you have to feel it, just let it floww it's good to learn the technicals but you have to realize that blues is a state of emotion not just what you play, so my advice as far as soloing just let your soul shine in the strings, does'nt have to be fast or intricate it just has to be pure, ya know take how you feel and let your guitar be the conduit of your heart.
i know it may sound corny but hey it's been my philosophy the whole time i've been playin and i trust my gut about playin more than a book, but either medium is good. sorry if i have'nt helped and if my more spiritual way has helped, glad i could be of some assistance to you.



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Re: LEARNING BLUES LEAD

11/5/2005 5:21 AM

J.R. Libby (219) wrote:

Thanks for all the advice...let me tell you what I know, over the past year I've learned power chords, hammeron's, pulloffs, vibratos, slides and slurs, and I know three songs, Mary had a Little Lamb, kids version, house of the rising sun, single notes version, and the rhythm of Look at Little Sister by SRV. I also just picked up his 2 DVD set and love it. I have avoided chords and barre chords. I'm working right now with the book/cd set by Hal Leonard called Blues Guitar, and I have a 2 DVD set coming along with the book to go along with them that covers Blues for the very beginner, with several slow paced blues songs. So I will learn how to do this, it will just take some time. SRV and BB King are great, and I love their styles, but I also know there are others out there with a slower style that could really help me right now. So is there a few slow paced blues players you could recoment that I listen to who use an electric guitar. (not that it matters, but I play a Peavey tele style guitar). And thanks for all your help, you've all been great.

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Re: LEARNING BLUES LEAD

11/2/2005 11:27 PM

Ken Richardson (9051) wrote:

Years ago I had a blues backing track that came with a book......... learned a lot of how to improvise in the blues by playing over the progression, plus it had drums on it to keep the time......
Once you learn a bit about vibrato (B.B. King style) and string bending, as well as some basic licks/scales its a lot of fun and educational to jam with CD's or some kind of instrumental track

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Re: LEARNING BLUES LEAD

11/5/2005 6:22 PM

J.R. Libby (219) wrote:

Wow, I like put up a couple responces the other day, I have no idea where theyy went...but I'll tryy again..I have been learning with a Hal Leonard BLUES GUITAR book and cd, and I just bought what I think will end up being a veryy good learning tool for me, the ultimate beginners series BLUE GUITAR BASIC's byy Keith Wyatt...it came with both DVD's and cd along with book, and some of the reviews had said there is enough stuff in here to keep you busy for a few years, and I do believe they might be right. But he brings you along piece by piece, from the very easy stuff on up to advance, so I think this is exactly what I've been needing to learn blues. And I plan on working on them scales every day...

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Re: LEARNING BLUES LEAD

11/8/2005 4:33 PM

Paul Bowes (154) wrote:

Try playing the following sequence. It can start at any fret (shown here starting on fret five), and the first note is taken with the fourth finger of the fretting hand. There is a slide on the fourth string that you can make either with the first finger or with fourth finger (or you can make it as a silent position change). The whole thing is a two octave blues scale. I usually play it with hammer-ons from the minor to the major third and from the sixth to the flat seven. Once you have it fixed in your head you can play fragments or sections of it, up or down.