Respond to This

Suggestions on nylon string guitar?

Suggestions on a nylon-stringed guitar?



This christmas I am hoping to get a classical guitar. I want a guitar that is good. My definition of a "good" guitar is that its sound is efficient and it is easy to play.



I want it to have a cut-away on it too.



Any advice or suggestions? Remember, I want a classical one with a cut-away.
Adrian
Responses
Respond to this

Re: Suggestions on nylon string guitar?

10/15/2005 1:40 PM

Adrian Levi (2907) wrote:

Hey Michael,

Check out Almansa. They're made in Spain and for some reason
are ridiculously cheap (start at about $300 canadian) but they're
awesome. I have one of their cheapest ones and it's really easy
to play with a nice loud tone. I'm not sure if they have one with a
cutaway but they probably do.

Later,

Adrian

Respond to this

Re: Suggestions on nylon string guitar?

10/15/2005 1:42 PM

Adrian Dupree (4969) wrote:

I am sorry. Micheal accidently copied my message and posted it on there. It was a mistake. Adrian, that was me speaking up their. ARRGG! How confusing!
Adrian

Respond to this

Re: Suggestions on nylon string guitar?

10/15/2005 2:43 PM

Andy Wood (5136) wrote:

What?? I still don't get it!

As far as classical guitars go, I won't bother suggesting brands because I'm in a different country and I don't know what you have where you live. One thing I can tell you is that if you want it to be loud and full bodied, forget the cutaway. It robs a classical guitar of a lot of balance, resonance and volume. A player with a good classical technique can still get up there when neccessary and the classical repertoire clever handles high notes anyway. A cutaway would only be needed if you were into playing a lot of high solos accross all the strings and didn't want to bother with the classical higher fret technique. If you wanted to plug it into an amp I think a cutaway is a reasonable option because your amp can make up for what the cutaway takes away. I don't know what your budget is but anything under $1,000 US with a cutaway will be noticeably deficient compared to its full bodied counterpart. But it's your call, if it sounds good buy it - forget brands, but what you think sounds good and you can afford.

Andy

Respond to this

Re: Suggestions on nylon string guitar?

10/15/2005 4:58 PM

Adrian Dupree (4969) wrote:

Thanks for the suggestions. You see, I want to play classical, but I want to get a guitar that is easier to play, and that is loud at the same time. Maybe I don't need a nylon stringed guitar with a cut-away. The internet is a good place to seek and suggest brands.



P.S. The incident is very hard to explain. Its a long story. Something weird just happened.But anyway, forget about it.

Respond to this

Re: Suggestions on nylon string guitar?

10/15/2005 8:18 PM

Gary Murphy (3498) wrote:

I strongly agree with you Andy. Good post. I think even putting in electronics is a compromise, but it is a compromise that has worked well for me. I really like my Hirade. I have played customs w/o electonic that I like better, but I use the electronics frequently.

Respond to this

Re: Suggestions on nylon string guitar?

10/16/2005 2:17 AM

RON Zimmer (1453) wrote:

I am sure everyone knows this, but is worth mentioning again. Make sure you know what makes a good guiatar "good". Look at the materials used in the consrtuction of the guitars you are considering and learn what affects the different materials have on sound reproduction. Mahogany vs Rosewood vs Brazilin Rosewood; or ply top vs solid top; etc.

Materials and construction methods have a profound affect on the sound and playability of a guitar. Moreso than who made it I think.

Respond to this

Re: Suggestions on nylon string guitar?

10/16/2005 11:39 AM

Gary Murphy (3498) wrote:

True. I like solid cedar tops for classical with solid rosewood backs and sides.

Respond to this

Re: Suggestions on nylon string guitar?

10/16/2005 1:01 PM

Andy Wood (5136) wrote:

Yes, it's hard to go past cedar and rosewood. That makes for the sweetest sound - although the sides are less critical than the top. In Australia a lot of local builders have started using Tasmanian Blackwood which has reasonably similar density to Rosewood and is very plentiful - which is important in these days of depleting rainforests. Cedar is a must to me though. Spruce is much harsher and more direct but also projects more. Many louder classicals are made with very tight grained, ulra-thin tops - they sound like they are plugged into a Marshall they are so loud!

Andy

Respond to this

Re: Suggestions on nylon string guitar?

10/16/2005 9:57 PM

Gary Murphy (3498) wrote:

I've just moved to Houston. A local music store here carries a classical made in Mexico. The luthier has a stack of 100 year old Brazilian Rosewood. That's the story anyway. No trees are being cut. I don't know what he will do when he runs out of stock.

Spruce is an interesting wood. The wood vibrates at different rates along the grain than it does across the grain. That is one of the reasons so many musical instruments are made from spruce. The weird characteristic produces a interesting overtones. I like the spruce tops for steel string acoustics and archtop guitars. The pure sound of cedar is really nice for classical.

I love that guy that grew up in LA and moved to Australia (or vise versa) who plays slide guitar on a 12 string acoustic and overdrives that sound through a Marshall. He has a great band, too. I can't think of his name.