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songwriting

There's lots and lots of exercises fro shredders and everything, but what about us songwriter wannabes. What should we practice to get really good, what exercises should we do daily to become awesome melody writers, 'cause that's what I'm thinking of mostly, how to write good vocal melodies.
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Re: songwriting

11/19/2000 7:57 PM

Bjrn Van den Eeckhout (2189) wrote:

Dear Aron, there is only one answer to your question and that is to write, and then write some more. I've posted a simular type of question a while ago, 'cause I thought I was writing to much. Well, there is only one thing you can do, and that is to pick up a couple of blank pages and start writing.

I work with keywords. This means that I have a lot of words in a written down, sorted by topic.
There's love, hate, peace, war, happiness, pain, etc... It is called word-association. Every word is linked to your topic.
So now you pick a topic, decide what you want to tell, and pick out the keywords you can use.
Always put the keyword at the end of your sentence. If you feel the words should rhyme then you must figure out some words that do.
Write, delete(keep it handy though) and rewrite.
After a while you will place the keywords in an other place, certainly when you make rhymes.

The WholeNutter.



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Re: songwriting

11/19/2000 8:10 PM

Chuck Stensrud (13014) wrote:

Stick with what Bjorn said. Just keep writing, writing, writing. You'll eventually start seeing what is good, and what is not.





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Re: songwriting

11/19/2000 8:18 PM

Chuck Stensrud (13014) wrote:

There is one thing I've discovered over the years - write, put away for a few days, then view again critically. This allows you to be more objective about what you write. Change as appears right.





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Re: songwriting

11/20/2000 3:28 AM

Aron Lindberg (345) wrote:

The problem is not lyrics, but melody!





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Re: songwriting

11/20/2000 12:42 PM

Chuck Stensrud (13014) wrote:

Never mind . . .







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Re: songwriting

11/21/2000 12:58 AM

Bjrn Van den Eeckhout (2189) wrote:

Melody in lyrics, or melody in music ?
If in music then I'd say practice, practice, more practice, and then some. Creativity comes, but to put it on the fretboard is another thing. Therefor you'll need to practice.

If in lyrics, well, ...

The WholeNutter.





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Re: songwriting

11/28/2000 12:08 AM

Tony Boyd (189) wrote:

I would say learn your chords and learn them well. Practice chord inversions too. Learn a little chord construction theory, too. The rest will come with practice.



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Re: songwriting

12/6/2000 12:27 AM

Mike DiBernardo (258) wrote:

i find that i write my best stuff when i put aside everything I've been listening to for the past month or so, and turn my ears onto something completely different. but in a technical aspect, definitely learn your circle of fifths...that will take care of learning the notes in the keys and how to remember them, and from there you'll want to learn the pattern for which chords are major, minor and diminished in each key: I ii ii IV V7 vi viio

Take some time to learn those couple things, and then try to get good at writing chord progressions and the melodies will fall into place themselves.

DiBo

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Re: songwriting

11/19/2000 8:50 PM

Alvin Mullen (1442) wrote:

To me the best songs are poetry. You can read them without the music and they have meter and tempo. Pick up some books on creative writing/poetry or take a class at a local college.
Perhaps I'm biased in this thinking as I'm a beginning guitar player, but have been writing stories and poetry for many years. And I was an associate editor at a literary magazine for a year. But I really think of lyrics as poetry and always have, even before I started writing seriously.

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Re: songwriting

12/4/2000 10:34 PM

John Holmes (57) wrote:

I dont write lyrics, but as far as writing music for songs, there are 3 things you should know!!!

1-learn the circle of fifths
2-understand the circle of fifths
3-use the circle of fifths

It is the only "tool" for writing music that I know of, there are no shortcuts!!

BUT THATS JUST MY OPINION

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Re: songwriting

12/7/2000 1:59 AM

Bjrn Van den Eeckhout (2189) wrote:

And then there's this thing they call feeling. Theory is very important, but in the end it all comes down to what you feel is the right sound. Theory is a guide, not a law.

The WholeNutter.

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Re: songwriting

12/7/2000 2:55 AM

John Holmes (57) wrote:

very true....good point.....SOMETIMES THE DIATONICS NEED A LITTLE ADJUSTMENT TO SOUND LIKE I WANT TOO-
I ALWAYS TRUST MY EAR, NO MATTER WHAT THE BOOKS SAY..

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Re: songwriting

12/7/2000 5:05 AM

Charles Gacsi (42523) wrote:

Analyze the songs you play for chord progression patterns. See if the patterns are the same in each key. Learn additional chord progressions that work in every key. Learn the possible resolutions the chords might take, especially the dominant 7th chords. Different progressions will give you different sounds that your ear may not be used to hearing. These can lead your musical thought into different unexplored areas for your mind. Once you have these under your fingertips, a lot will flow like water, or wine. Sometimes so fast that you might have three or four songs that come out at the same time. The hard part then is to be able to separate the songs and parts. Sometimes the last comes first, or the verse will be out of position. Use sequences. Let it flow.. don't strain in trying to find that specific sound.

Good luck

Charlie