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Being a guitar teacher

hey i teach some of my friends to play guitar and i am good at it so they told me i should get a job as one, i have taught quite a few people, i play in my school jazz band, i know theory and i can read music, and i have a good ear for music, i am 16 and i am more into the guitar than most people that i know of, but my question is how do you deal with absolute beginners and people who are already intermediates on the guitar, how do you build them up, what should you expect out of them each lesson, should you give them things to learn or should i let them decide what they want me to teach, should i teach them theory or just transcribe songs for them, i know i'll do good but i am new to this and i know that many of you have taught for quite a while, if you could offer some tips , examples or stories of how you teach or have taught so i can be the best teacher formy students, and it pays $6 every half hour, man that is sweet considering i am only 16, but any help would be helpful, i appreciate it, thanks.
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Re: Being a guitar teacher

10/27/2000 6:09 AM

Charles Gacsi (42523) wrote:

Look at the lessons on WHOLE NOTE for beginners and the next level. Communication is important in conveying ideas. There are many times I don't even pick up a guitar during the lesson because I'm paying attention to the student.
Find things that will help the student develop his skill.
You can get in over your head. If that happens, don't hesitate to refer them to another more experienced teacher.
Demonstrate, but don't get on an ego trip and just play for the student.
Let the student ask questions. Then try to answer them. If you don't know, say so and that you will take it under consideration to find an answer.
Don't try to snow a student as they will find out your weaknesses.


That's the best I can give you.

Charlie

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Re: Being a guitar teacher

10/27/2000 8:45 AM

Inactive Member wrote:

It's hard to generalise, every student is different. It depends on what the student wants to achieve. Does he only want to be able to strum some songs, it will put him/her off if you try to force theory. If somebody wants to become a good player, you have every right to feed him theory, ear training, sight reading ....

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Re: Being a guitar teacher

10/27/2000 10:10 AM

Steve Suomu (680) wrote:

You should first begin teaching what you know, students come to you to because they like what you do, or someone has told them of your skill. If they didn't want your knowledge, they would not ask. (A person who wanted to leard country licks wouldn't go to someone who plays metal )

BUT (here comes the but) teaching is also a learning experience for the teacher as well. If a student has a question, or wants to learn a different style, you should go out and find the answer, or learn the style. It is amazing just how much a teacher learns as well.

The last point I want to make is that a teacher needs to let the student grow into his/her style, by giving enough information for them to develop originality. (do you want your students to play exactly like you? Your students do, but give them the tools to evolve, they'll be better for it.)

Have fun, enjoy & learn.
Steve



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Re: Being a guitar teacher

10/27/2000 12:55 PM

Eric Stanbrough (1108) wrote:

so pretty much i should talk to the student, and get to know what they want to learn and teach it to them, and find out what goals they have and help them get there, but i shouldn't force it, you get out what you put in,and i can see how it would help the teacher too , since going back to the basics and fundamentals can helpalso while teaching a beginner, and if the student got to where he didn't need lessons anymore, would it be right of me to tell him so, and should i be patient and let the student dictate the pace of what he/shelearns or should i try to get a lot done in a lesson, i took lessons for a while and i wanted to learn so i learned very quickly and then i realized all my lessons were turning into was jam sessions and i didn't want to pay to jam so thats when i stopped taking lessons and continued learning until i got to the point where i was ready to teach myself , i realized though that some students didn't care that much and they just wanted to learn a few songs or whatever, and should i just do that, let the student demand what i teach, because that makes my job easier because some students who really want to learn will and those that don't can come in and learn there korn songs or metallica or whatever and they'll be happy too, there were even some students that i've seen that just want to waste there parents money and don't really care, they just want to try to learn a few little riffs and don't really care about playing the guitar, should i try to motivate him or just goat his pace and let him learn what he wants, i want to do a good job for the store and if a few students go in and don't care, am i still doing my job right, will the store owner get mad at me if some students don't care to learn and aren't learning , or will they not even worry about it, i just want to be the best teacher i can be, i am excited to be a teacher, making $12 an hour playing guitar is amazing and i want to do my best for that money, but i want to know how to deal with each type of student so everyone is happy with there guitar lessons, you know what i mean, thank you everyone.



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Re: Being a guitar teacher

10/27/2000 2:03 PM

Steve Suomu (680) wrote:

You raised a lot of good points. Keep in mind that every student is different, what works for one may not work for another. As you mentioned, some students just want to learn a few riffs, show them the riffs and if you can, explain why the work (that's my way of sneaking in some theory).If you don't know why they work someone at WN will.
I belive that you shold know how to read music and understand some theory if you want to become a well rounded musician. Give it to them in little bits, remind them often and they will remember.

Yes,some don't want to be there, they won't last long, others need motivation, and some need someone to talk to. Some of my most memorable lessons(as a teacher and a student) involved no music at all.
Keep it fun and interesting.Show them how much fun it is for you.
Steve



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Re: Being a guitar teacher

10/27/2000 2:36 PM

Eric Stanbrough (1108) wrote:

thanks steve , i appreciate your help, and i can see what you mean, i guess i'll have to be a guitar teacher/pscychiatrist in some situations, lol, you have helped alot, and i hope if i have any more questions i can ask you, and i can remember when my old teacher and i talked about things other than music, and thats ow i got to know him and thats why he is still a friend of mine, i appreciate all of your help, thanks alot.

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Re: Being a guitar teacher

10/27/2000 2:52 PM

Jim Kangas (1957) wrote:

Eric - Man, you are in a great position; I envy you. I am a lifelong student (I'm 49) and I can say that I've probably been like all of those different "types" that you mention at one time or another. The last several years I've been very hungry to learn everything I can, *especially* theory, etc.

To me, the best teachers are ones that inspired me not with how fast they played or how much theory they knew, but with how much they loved music and how infinite the process of learning about it becomes. Believe me - it shows. I am fortunate right now to be taking lessons with two pros right now. They know theory cold and can play rings around almost anyone I've ever seen, but they really love music - lots of times tunes that they've played thousands of times.

I have to admit that I feel a lot better when they relate their personal history about being in the same place (developmenatlly speaking) as I am now.

Good luck!

-Jim


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Re: Being a guitar teacher

10/27/2000 3:06 PM

Peppe Lahtinen (1754) wrote:

Congratulations Eric! Teaching guitar is very rewarding job. It is definitely the best job I have ever had. To have 100 FIM (20 USD)/hour from doing something that you like to do for free was really cool. I guess there is no much to add after previous responses, but very important thing for me is helping the beginners to be motivated and like every moment they practise or play. It shouldnt feel like a job from the day one. Good luck!