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Martin Scorsese'sThe Blues

I don't know if anyone happened to catch this last night on PBS. It wasn't bad. They had a good amount on Son House and some Robert Johnson.

Wondering what people thought and any insight to learning to play that style of blues? Tips, site's to check out, etc.
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Re: Martin Scorsese'sThe Blues

9/29/2003 10:52 AM

Joe Lawrence (578) wrote:

I thought it focused a little too heavily on the main character's return to Africa. It was interesting, but it felt like it dragged on for 2/3 of the show.



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Re: Martin Scorsese'sThe Blues

9/29/2003 12:15 PM

Sean McCarthy (1962) wrote:

Funny, I actually shut it off when they got to that part. :)

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Re: Martin Scorsese'sThe Blues

9/29/2003 2:23 PM

Andrew Vere (617) wrote:

it was a great!!!! I too thought the trip to Africa was focused on a bit too much. They should of focused more on Robert Johnson just because of his vast influence still being felt today. Also the whole "selling his soul" plot would of made for great tv. ;o)


i personally would of liked to see more on Ledbelly

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Re: Martin Scorsese'sThe Blues

9/29/2003 2:41 PM

Rex Jones (12455) wrote:

I liked the show.
The roots of the blues, going back to Africa, seeing the homemade flutes, and the drums.
I didn't know any of that stuff before last night.
I even taped it :-)
Lot's of old Harmony guitars :-)
I can't wait for tonight !
Uncle Rex

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Re: Martin Scorsese'sThe Blues

9/29/2003 3:29 PM

Sean McCarthy (1962) wrote:

What did you guys think of Son House's playing? Man, very percussive huh? Almost like a drum and a guitar in the same.

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Re: Martin Scorsese'sThe Blues

9/29/2003 3:36 PM

Sean McCarthy (1962) wrote:

In case anyone wants to check out the remaining episodes, looks like it gets a lot better from here:

Feel like Going Home: Directed by Martin Scorsese and featuring original performances by Taj Mahal, Keb' Mo', Corey Harris, Othar Turner, Ali Farka Tour, Salif Keita, and Habib Koit.

The Soul of a Man: Directed by Wim Wenders and featuring performances by Bonnie Raitt, Lucinda Williams, Lou Reed, Eagle-Eye Cherry, Nick Cave, Jon Spencer Blues Explosion, Cassandra Wilson, Los Lobos, T Bone Burnett, Beck, Marc Ribot, Shemekia Copeland, and Garland Jeffreys, plus clips of Skip James, Blind Willie Johnson, and J. B. Lenoir.

The Road to Memphis: Directed by Richard Pearce and featuring original performances by B. B. King, Bobby Rush, Rosco Gordon, and Ike Turner, plus clips of Elmore James, Jackie Brenston, Little Junior Parker's Blue Flames, Bobby "Blue" Bland, and Sonny Boy Williamson.

Warming by the Devil's Fire: Directed by Charles Burnett and featuring music from Robert Johnson, Billie Holiday, Jelly Roll Morton, Bessie Smith, Elmore James, Willie Dixon, Muddy Waters, Charley Patton, Lightnin' Hopkins, John Lee Hooker, and others.

Godfathers and Sons: Directed by Marc Levin and featuring original performances by Koko Taylor, Otis Rush, Magic Slim, Ike Turner, Sam Lay, and the Electric MidKats (featuring Chuck D.), plus clips of Muddy Waters, Howlin' Wolf, Buddy Guy, Jimmy Reed, Little Walter, Bo Diddly, and the Paul Butterfield Blues Band.

Red White & Blues: Directed by Mike Figgis and featuring original performances by Jeff Beck, Van Morrison, Tom Jones, and Lulu, plus clips of John Mayall and the Bluesbreakers (with Eric Clapton), the Spencer Davis Group (with Steve Winwood), Big Bill Broonzy, Cream, and Fleetwood Mac.

Piano Blues: Directed by Clint Eastwood and featuring clips of Ray Charles, Dr. John, Fats Domino, Pinetop Perkins, Jay McShann, Jelly Roll Morton, Professor Longhair, Dave Brubeck, and others



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Re: Martin Scorsese'sThe Blues

9/30/2003 1:12 AM

Jim Burger (4613) wrote:

I happened to catch part of "the Soul of a Man" tonight, mostly the part on Skip James. I thought it was fantastic, especially the way they recreated the old-time scenes.

I have to say, though, that when they cut between Skip's originals and the modern covers, it REALLY made the modern artists look pathetic and amateurish. Lucinda Williams, The John Spencer Blues Explosion, Beck, even Lou Reed -- they looked so obviously lacking in talent and long on image when compared with Skip. I don't know if that was the director's intent, but it sure was the message I got.

On the other hand, the clips of Bonnie Raitt and Alvin Youngblood Hart doing true acoustic covers of the Skip James songs looked very compelling to me, so I guess it's probably just a question of my personal taste. But watching Beck blow listlessly (should I say tonelessly? talentlessly?) into his harmonica while banging pointlessly on his guitar and singing Skip James lyircs that had nothing to do with what he was playing was a real mood-breaker for me, I was really enjoying the film until that point...



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Re: Martin Scorsese'sThe Blues

9/30/2003 5:29 PM

Sean McCarthy (1962) wrote:

I agree completely...Bonnie Raitt was fantastic. I always thought she was good but seeing just her and the guitar was great. She has a fantastic voice, really got to the core of the those tunes.

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Re: Martin Scorsese'sThe Blues

9/30/2003 9:43 AM

Tom Cavanagh (2608) wrote:

I've really enjoyed the segments about Skip James, Son House and Robert Johnson. I actually enjoyed the episode with the musicians from Mali. Habib Koit is an incredible performer. Of the younger musicians in the documentary, I'm impressed with Corey Harris and Keb' Mo', both great players, IMHO. I'm looking forward to the rest of the episodes.

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Re: Martin Scorsese'sThe Blues

9/30/2003 10:18 AM

Inactive Member wrote:

Hey Sean, I have been picking up some great stuff here at the "Note", one I love to play everytime I pick up the acoustic is Charlie Patton's Pony Blues... ....I know Jim Burger and Bruce Maag have some great blues lessons here.

I missed the program, any word on when there will be more of it, or when it may air again?

BK



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Re: Martin Scorsese'sThe Blues

9/30/2003 5:28 PM

Sean McCarthy (1962) wrote:

Its still running. Its a 7 part series so its not too late to catch it!

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