Respond to This

Diatonic Triads in a Minor Key

Jonathan Lohnes (327)

Guitar Theory Forum · 11/16/2002 12:44 PM
OK I have a question here.
I know that if Im writing a major diantonic progression the triads are as follows: maj/min/min/maj/maj/min/dim

Is it the same in a minor progression?

Would anyone who knows spell it out for me?
Responses  [ Pages: 1 · 2 ]
Respond to this

Re: Diatonic Triads in a Minor Key

11/17/2002 12:20 AM

Inactive Member wrote:

Do you mean natural minor???


If so ,then the scale tone chords for the key of A minor would go like this..........



A minor (a c e)
B diminished (b d f)
C MAJOR (c e g)
D minor (d f a)
E minor (e g b)
F MAJOR (f a c)
G MAJOR (g b d)
A minor.

(a c e)
You'll notice it's the same sequence just starting from the 6th degree.



Respond to this

Re: Diatonic Triads in a Minor Key

11/17/2002 12:55 AM

Jonathan Lohnes (327) wrote:

yeah man i meant natural minor.thanks a lot that was a big help.



Respond to this

Re: Diatonic Triads in a Minor Key

11/17/2002 1:19 AM

Inactive Member wrote:

Anytime :)

Respond to this

Re: Diatonic Triads in a Minor Key

11/17/2002 2:12 AM

Inactive Member wrote:

The best way to understand why anyone would even want to compose in a minor key can be boiled down to one concept. Three scales are better than one

The natural minor is a good place to start, but the diatonic chord structure of the melodic and harmonic minor must also be learned to take full advantage of composing in a minor key.

-Chris-


Respond to this

Re: Diatonic Triads in a Minor Key

11/18/2002 8:32 AM

Jon Riley (9697) wrote:

The natural minor scale is not a "key". It's a mode (aeolian mode).

Despite what Chris says, it's perfectly possible to compose in aeolian mode.
But he's also right that, for a minor key, you need to think about using a V7 chord. (This is because, if you use too many chords in natural minor/aeolian, it will just sound like the relative major key.)

That means, in A minor, using an E7 instead of Em7.
That, in turn, means you have just created the A harmonic minor scale: you've changed the G for G#, giving you A-B-C-D-E-F-G#.
And that scale (if you want) can produce its own set of chords:

Amin (Am(maj7)) A-C-E-G#
Bdim (Bm7b5) B-D-F-A
Caug (Cmaj7#5) C-E-G#-B
Dmin (Dm7) D-F-A-C
Emaj (E7) E-G#-B-D
Fmaj (Fmaj7) F-A-C-E
G#dim (G#dim7) G#-B-D-F

You can go one further and raise the 6th of the scale to give you A melodic minor: A-B-C-D-E-F#-G#.
That gives you yet another slightly different set of chords:

Amin (Am(maj7)) A-C-E-G#
Bmin (Bm7) B-D-F#-A
Caug (Cmaj7#5) C-E-G#-B
Dmaj (D7) D-F#-A-C
Emaj (E7) E-G#-B-D
F#dim (F#m7b5) F#-A-C-E
G#dim (G#m7b5) G#-B-D-F#

That sounds terribly complicated, having to juggle three scales and three sets of chords, but it isn't really.
You basically stick with your natural minor scale and chords, until you need (or want) to use any of the others. They're there if you need them, to make things more interesting; but you may only ever use the E7 . That's all you need to make an A minor KEY out of an A minor SCALE.

JonR



Respond to this

Re: Diatonic Triads in a Minor Key

11/18/2002 8:56 AM

Inactive Member wrote:

Jon, I didn't say it wasn't possible, just that it's not really advantageous to consider only the natural minor.





Respond to this

Re: Diatonic Triads in a Minor Key

11/18/2002 3:01 PM

Jon Riley (9697) wrote:

Accepted - and I agreed fully with the second sentence of your previous answer.
I just thought there was a strange overtone in your first sentence, implying (even if unintentionally) that there was no mileage in natural minor alone.
Aeolian mode is just a subtly different kind of sound from the minor key, and I thought it worthwhile pointing that out.

JonR



Respond to this

Re: Diatonic Triads in a Minor Key

11/19/2002 10:29 PM

Inactive Member wrote:

Minor key is a term that is widely used.



Respond to this

Re: Diatonic Triads in a Minor Key

11/20/2002 2:57 PM

Jon Riley (9697) wrote:

Uh-huh...
...and your point is?



Respond to this

Re: Diatonic Triads in a Minor Key

11/21/2002 9:29 PM

Inactive Member wrote:

Hi jon,


Hmmm,thought you were having a go at me by saying,"the natural minor scale is not a key ,it's a mode".


Of course your right.Guess i'm too used to arguing on this site lol.

More Responses  [ Pages: 1 · 2 ]