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Rock Solo

Jason Parker (2612) · [archive]
Style: Theory/Reference · Level: Intermediate · Tempo: 120
Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50

You can also play Minor Chords in these keys.

The Aeolian Relationship (Relative Major/Minor)

G / Em

D / Bm

C / Am

F / Dm

A / F#m

E / C#m

B / G#m

For every Major chord, there is a Minor chord that has a lot of the same notes. The G chord has many of the same notes as the Em chord. Em is G's Relative Minor Chord.

Am is C's Relative Minor Chord.

Bm is D's Relative Minor Chord.

Therefore, whenever we play a progression that contains a G chord, we can also play an Em Chord. For every C chord, we can play Am as well.

Let's take the Key of G...

We can play G, D, and C. We can also play Em, Bm, and Am.

G is relative to Em.

D is relative to Bm.

C is relative to Am.

Behold, a chord progression in the Key of G with minor chords.

Rock Solo - Page 5