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Intermission, Meet Us At The Bar (c) DH

Douglas Hirsch (860) · [archive]
Style: Rock/Pop · Level: Intermediate · Tempo: 200
Pages: 1

While playing a club or venue, there's always that...."time for the band to take a break".... So here's a "little diddy" I wrote to play and fade out while announcing that necessary 20 minute break we need to relax and re-group for the next set. Using the half step from Bb7 to the A7 at the end of the piece, imparts that "classic" jazz/blues feel. Can you catch the bit of "Popeye The Sailor Man" jingle in the tune? I just get caught up in those little "Beckisms". One of my favorite guitarists is Jeff Beck, a good old Brit, who was so influenced by Django and Chet Atkins and Les Paul. This influence is exemplified during Jeffs early Yardbirds days of the 1960s, by a tune he wrote called: Jeffs Boogie. Its a standard 1-4-5 rock-a-billy type cut a la Chet Atkins and Les Paul where Jeff captures their sound and timbre. Beck has this uncanny way of popping in the most unexpected nursery rhyme, jingle or completely dissonant bend of notes, which gives his guitar work and music real personality..........I was thinking of breaking down the lesson into its three components and showing how each layer relates to the entire piece. It may have a burp here or there, but I liken them to the scars and scratches that give a leather jacket its character, if I may make the analogy. But in accordance with sound musicianship and theory, I will correct where I can, as I become more adept with the on-line composing tools.

I started out with the Sequence #25006: A Classic Blues Ending (This is a walking Line), which is a most fundamental piece. I probably recall this from the first time I sat down with my Mel Bay book, when I was 7. 2nd Sequence............................................................................................................................................................................ This the A7 Walking Line/Arpeggio. In the piece, it's played a whole note per measure and provides a subtle background.Thus it begins at meaures 1 through 10 and concludes with the Bb7 to A7 chord at from the measures 11 to 12. It was timed to end, just as the fanning of the 16th note triplet chords provides a segway into the "Popeye" jingle.

Then I thought of how Id like to have a swing-like feel for the rhythm section and worked up the: Groove #7144: Blues Groove Groove...........I later just let what was inside of me out onto the fret board and this is what occurred. Sequence #25102: Intermission accompaniment (This is the Lead) Main Sequence ......Try listening to the component parts one at a time then bring them in as two, then three as a whole piece.....where the whole becomes the sum of its parts. Try slowing the tempo down and experiment with different tempos. I think any tempo faster than 220, would sound like a runaway 33rpm LP, played at 78rpm. ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... I think the piece be best played by two guitarists, whereby both can trade off the riffs and measures, similar to the call and response across the mountain tops between two good friends.

A7
D7
E7
B7
A7 Arpeggio
Bb7
A7
Intermission, Meet Us At The Bar (c) DH