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Chord Triads All Over The Neck

Shawn Strickland (2570) · [archive]
Style: Jazz · Level: Intermediate · Tempo: 120
Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14

There are different ways to make a triad, three of them to be exact. They are Root Position, 1st Inversion, and 2nd Inverison. We get the names of these by the way that they are stacked up on notation paper. If a triad started on C, went to E, then to G all in a upward direction, it would be called a Root Postition of C. If a triad started on E, went to G, then to C, it would be the 1st Inverison of C. And then the last one would be the 2nd Inversion. The 2nd Inversion of C is made by stacking the G, then the C, then the E in an upward direction. Just dicided to let you know that first...
We'll start with the C triad (C E G) all over the neck in the four string groups possible; 6th string down. Starting on the 6th string:
2nd inversion
Root Position
1st Inversion
Then starting on the 5th string:
Root Position
1st Inversion
2nd Inversion
Next is ones in C on the 4th string:
1st Inversion
2nd Inversion
Root Position
The Finally are the ones starting on the G string:
2nd Inversion
Root Position
1st Inversion


Also, these triads have inversions of them, meaning that they are the same chord, they just start on a different note. Like, Root Position is C E G, 1st Inversion is E G C, and 2nd inversion is G C E. Thats how you get the different sounding chord, but not an actual different chord.

Now, you can connect those any way that you want and you'll have the C major triad all over the neck.