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Arpeggios And Triads Oh Great Fun

Shawn Strickland (2570) · [archive]
Style: Theory/Reference · Level: Beginner · Tempo: 120
Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6

I am starting out with the complete beginners, but everybody could learn something from this.
Let's look at this:
C D E F G A B C D E F G A B C
looks like a regular C major Scale right? It could also be the map to a chord...
How you say?
When we look at the scale, we see notes, and if you have any guitar knowledge at all, we are an instrument that can play chords, so lets do them.
We'll take the C major scale and take every other note, like this:
C E G B D F A
(now that's a lot of chord tones= a certain note of the chord)
Now, play the first three notes up there on your guitar.
C Major Arpeggio
That is what we like to call the "C Major Arpeggio," arpeggio meaning that it is a sequenced chord.
With these three notes you can play them in any rhythm in any time and it would sound good over a C major Chord.
Now, we'll add the next note:
C E G B
This is what is called the C major 7 arpeggio. The 7 comes from it because the B (The inserted note) is the seventh note of the scale that chord is made from. Got it? Good
C Major 7 Arpeggio