Overall Rating: 5.0 (of 5)
Rating Votes %
3 100 ||
0 0 ||
0 0 ||
0 0 ||
0 0 ||
From 3 votes total
Rate This Lesson
Rate from 1 (poor) to 5 (best)
Send Feedback

The SHAPE

Darrin Koltow (383) · [archive]
Style: Theory/Reference · Level: Beginner · Tempo: 120
Pages: 1 2

By Darrin Koltow

I call this chord The SHAPE, because that's just the kind of pretentiousness and respect it deserves. I don't want to talk about it too much before you hear it, and hear the possibilities it offers your playing, and the spice it can add to your playing. Here we go:

Progression 1
Eb7b9
Abmaj7(13)


Progression 2
C7b9
F


or
C7b9
F


Progression 3
A7b9
D6


Progression 4
F#7b9
B


Extra Credit Progression!
Ebm7
Ebm7b5
Ab7+5
DbDim
Db


I threw in that last progression out of a rare fit of generosity. Or maybe I just couldn't stop myself because I'm having way too much fun writing this. Either way, forget about little old me for a second and pay attention to the first four progressions. They all have the same first chord, even though they have four different names. I want you to be aware of this, because how we name stuff deeply affects how we understand and *misunderstand* stuff. Not just with music, but with anything.

For example, you might see the same exact chords in Progression 4 on some sheet music, but the chords might have these names: Db diminished and B major. You might play this progression and think, "Man, that's a mighty strong sounding progression. It sounds like a V-I. Hmm, can't be: that would be F#7 going to B, and the notation here reads, 'Db diminished to B.' Oh well, I guess I'm just hearing things wrong. I guess I'll never have big ears."

Now, if this despairing soul were to read this article, or another good and gentle theory book, he'd see that his ears were correct. He *was* hearing an F#7 -- with a b9, and without the root.