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Dom7 Inversions

Kelly Johnson (55) · [archive]
Style: Theory/Reference · Level: Intermediate · Tempo: 120
Pages: 1

What happens when your faced with 18, 24 or more bars with just one chord in the rhythm part? Or for that matter, when you tire of sticking on a 7th chord in some I IV V blues?

You don't have to be a wiz to substitute, just invert what you have.

Inversions of chords...(re-arranging the notes of a chord) can provide a fresh sound when you get tired of playing the same shapes.

These examples are in C, but the concept and shapes apply to all keys.

C7
C7
C7
C7


You'll notice the diminished sounding quality in that 3rd inversion.

Now, as an excersize put a scale on top of those chords and play the inversions on the First, Third, Fifth and Seventh degree of the scale below.



Using the first inversion can get you oriented. The note in the bass is the ROOT and the pattern of chords is the same up the neck from that formation.

Mind the octave as these patterns overlap. In this case, if we're ready to switch to the IV chord of C, to F, we just start with the third inversion shape above, but at 2nd position:

F7
F7
F7
F7


See where we overlapped after the fourth inversion shape and started the pattern over with the first inversion?

Mixing these different inversions up is also great, you don't have to play these shapes one after another, it's just a good way to learn them. Then, once you have the shapes under your fingers, you can mix up playing the different inversions back to back or whatever you chose!