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Chords That Sound Well Together

Jason Henderson (5681) · [archive]
Style: Basics · Level: Beginner · Tempo: 150
Pages: 1

Alright, these are for those of you who can barely play any large amount of chords. You should be in Major chords, right? These chords provide you with the necessary sounds, and in the future, you will come across thousands of chords that will sound just like them, only a little different. Because if you look at the entire library of chords in retrospect, they're all the same chords just overlaping each other, small changes to each one individually. That will help clear some confusion. Now, right now I want to show you three of the most basic chords: G Major, D Major, and C Major. These chords, if you ever look at tab books, you will find these chords or chords like it eventually once. I garuntee it. Anyway, these chords are very easy to play, the hardest possibly being the C chord. If you can play them with only a small amount of ring, that's ok, as long as you can hear the tone of the chords, that's the important part. Alright, look at the groove I have set, and play it. it may sound a little wierd, but at least you'll be able to hear it for yourself. Scroll down and look at the pattern of chords, and play it for yourself.

see how the G chord is the heaviest chord, and C is a bit higher in treble, and the D is the highest? If you can follow a pattern like this, you've made music. The pattern guides the sound up and down, midway, then back down again. These are the basics here, don't forget it. Practice these chords for a while so you can play it in a row, change the pattern or the pace if you wish, that's what being a guitarist is all about.
Chords That Sound Well Together