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Barre Chord Practice

Chris Olson (114) · [archive]
Style: Theory/Reference · Level: Intermediate · Tempo: 120
Pages: 1 2 3 4

A guitarist that doesn't know the notes of his guitar is like a Nascar driver not knowing where the gas pedal is.

One of my pet peeves of a beginning guitarist, and he or she is serious about learning the guitar, is that they always try to dodge the root of all theory, positions of the notes.

This lesson is divided up into 4 parts: Basic overview of notes; Barre chords that are, E derived; A derived; and barre chords that are D derived/triads.

The first part of this lesson as described above is learning and memorizing the notes on the guitar, it really isn't that hard and can be accomplished quite easily just look at the provided diagram. The 6 rows that run horizontaly represent the six strings of your guitar, likewise the 12 columns represent the twelve frets on your guitar with "0" being open.

The fretboard follows a very basic system of half steps, a half step being one fret up the fretboard. Now once taken in consideration, you find that it takes one whole step or two half steps between each note, say "C" and "D". Now only twice does this pattern not comply with the whole step to each note approach. Only between "E" and "F", "B" and "C" does it only take one half step to get to the other base note. From that you get this basic puzzle of the chromatic scale, where a "W" means Whole, and a "H" means Half (W-W-H-W-W-W-H).

0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
Frets
(1) E
F
F#
G
G#
A
A#
B
C
C#
D
D#
E
(2) B
C
C#
D
D#
E
F
F#
G
G#
A
A#
B
(3) G
G#
A
A#
B
C
C#
D
D#
E
F
F#
G
(4) D
D#
E
F
F#
G
G#
A
A#
B
C
C#
D
(5) A
A#
B
C
C#
D
D#
E
F
F#
G
G#
A
(6) E
F
F#
G
G#
A
A#
B
C
C#
D
D#
E
Strings