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Rock (I-IV-V) Progressions

Rich Scott (693) · [archive]
Style: Rock/Pop · Level: Beginner · Tempo: 120
Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24





The I-IV-V Progression



Chord Substitutions:

The general Chord Substitution Rule holds that chords that share two or more notes in common can be readily substituted for each other. Below are several well-known songs created by using chord substitutions and inversions which use notes other than the Root as the bass note. The I-IV-V and the I-IV-V7 progressions are essentially interchangeable and the latter is presented below for purposes of analysis. The same holds true for the I5-IV5-V5 progression. These Power Chord substitutions are most frequently encountered in Hard Rock and Heavy Metal Music as these chords sound particularly good when distorted.

E-A-B6 = Mr. Big Stuff chorus (1971)
E-A-B7 = Everyday verse (1957) and Do You Love Me verse (1962), Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds chorus (1967)

E-A-Bsus4-B-Bsus2-B = You've Got To Hide Your Love Away chorus (1965)
E-A-B7-B7sus4-B7 = Here Comes The Sun verse (1971)
E-A-B7b9 = Hey Nineteen verse (1980)
E-A6-B = Na, Na, Hey, Hey, Kiss Him Goodbye verse (1969)
E-Amaj7-B = I Will Remember You verse (1995)
E-Esus4-E-A/C#-Bsus4 = Born To Run intro (1975)
Eadd9-Aadd9-B7sus = Missing You verse (1984)
E5-A5-B5 = I Love Rock 'N Roll chorus (1982)
C#m-A-B = I'm Eighteen verse (1971), Crazy On You chorus (1976).

The following chart shows a comparison of these progressions:

E-        A-    B6 
E-        A-    Bsus4-B-     Bsus2-B 
E-        A-    B7
E-        A-    B7-   B7sus4-B7 
E-        A-    B7b9    
E-        A6-   B
E-        Amaj7-B 
E-Esus4-E-A/C#- Bsus4 
Eadd9-    Aadd9-B7sus 
E5-       A5-   B5 
C#m-      A-    B


Steely Dan's verse to Hey Nineteen takes the I-IV-V Rock Progression and substitutes a "V7b9" chord for the typical "V" chord, creating the unique chord progression below.
Rock (I-IV-V) Progressions - Page 4