Overall Rating: 4.4 (of 5)
Rating Votes %
38 72 ||
8 15 ||
1 2 ||
0 0 ||
6 11 ||
From 53 votes total
Rate This Lesson
Rate from 1 (poor) to 5 (best)
Send Feedback

Rock (I-IV-V) Progressions

Rich Scott (693) · [archive]
Style: Rock/Pop · Level: Beginner · Tempo: 120
Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24





The I-V7-I-IV Progression


This progression adds an additional "I" chord to the I-V-IV progession between the "V" and "IV" chords. This progression, which has been around since the early 1700s, was used to write such songs as Auld Lang Syne (See Sheet Music) verse (1711), Silent Night (See Sheet Music) verse (1818), Blue Tail Fly "Jimmy Crack Corn" (See Sheet Music) chorus (1848), Old Folks At Home "Swanee River" (See Sheet Music)verse (1851), Save The Last Dance For Me (Hear Song - RealPlayer / See Tab) verse (1960), Under The Boardwalk (Hear Song - RealPlayer / See Tab) verse (1964), Ob-La-Di Ob-La-Da (See Tab) verse (1968).

Chord Substitutions:

Below are some well-known songs created by applying chord substitutions to the I-V7-I-IV progression. The most popular substitution is the "I7" chord for the second "I" chord.

E-B7-E-E7-A = She'll Be Comming Round The Mountain verse (1870), Happy Birthday verse (1935), When The Saints Go Marching In verse (1946), Me And Bobby McGee verse (1971), Cover Of The Rolling Stone verse (1973), and Blue Bayou chorus (1977)
E-B7-E-E7-A7 = Muddy Water verse (1966)
E-B7-E7-A = Bring It On Home To Me verse (1962)
E5-B7sus-E5-A = Sundown verse (1974)
Emaj7-Bm7-E7b9-Amaj7-A6 = Misty verse (1955)
Eadd9-E-Bm7-E9-Aadd9-A = September Morn
verse (1980)
E7-B7-E-A7 = Mockingbird verse (1974)

The following chart shows a comparison of these substitutions:

E-      B7-   E-E7-A 
E-      B7-   E-E7-A7 
E-      B7-   E7-  A 
E5-     B7sus-E5-  A 
Emaj7-  Bm7-  E7b9-Amaj7-A6
Eadd9-E-Bm7-  E9-  Aadd9-A 
E7-     B7-   E-   A7 
The openning verse progression to Auld Lang Syne is presented at the bottom of the page. I always use the following Standard I-vi-ii-V7 Progression substitution that can be used whenever you run across this type of I-V7-I-IV progression:

E    C#m7   F#m7 B7     E    C#m7   F#m7  B7
/ /  / /    / /  / /    / /  / /    / /   / /
Rock (I-IV-V) Progressions - Page 20