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Blues Soloing & Jamming

Carl Anderson (2230) · [archive]
Style: Blues · Level: Beginner · Tempo: 120
Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

The blues scale is the foundation of all soloing in blues music. It is also known as the pentatonic scale. It is basically a pattern that can be moved up and down the neck to play in any key, major or minor. The key of the pattern is determined by the note that the pattern starts on. That note, know as the root note, is on the low E string, where the pattern starts. For example, to play the pattern in Emin, you would start the pattern with the open E on the low E string, or on the 12th fret, which is an octave up. Pretty simple, huh?

Now, to play the pattern in a major key, you would move the whole pattern three frets down the neck. It looks like another key entirely, but it sound correct.

Here is a table of contents for this lesson.
1. This page-intro to the blues scale
2. 12 bar blues jam track in the key of E
3. Rock and Roll groove in the key of E
4. 12 bar blues jam track in the key of D
5. Intro to blues jamming(rythm)
6. 12 bar blues jam track in the key of E for rythm playing
7. 12 bar blues jam track in the key of D for rythm playing
8. Conclusion

Below, I have included the pattern for the Blues scale in the key of E, in both major and minor. Remember, you can move these scales up and down the neck for different keys. Run through these scales a few times to get familiar with them before moving on to the Jam Tracks in the following pages. Have fun!

Emin Blues
Emaj Blues Scale


P.S. Hey, when you are done with my lesson, please take a second to rate and/or send me feedback about my lesson, so I can improve it and make changes to suit your needs!