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Giant Steps Analysis.

Jeff Brent (2731) · [archive]
Style: Theory/Reference · Level: Expert · Tempo: 120
Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

"Giant Steps" Analysis

Most people treat "Giant Steps" as a disjointed collection of ii-V7-I and V7-I changes.

To properly analyze this tune, it must be done in 2/4 time (NOT 4/4).

Here is the genesis of how it was written:

There was/is a very popular Jazz exercise that does a ii-V7-I progression and then begins the next ii-V7-I in the sequence with a minor with the same name as the Major just before it. This runs through six keys before it returns to its starting point.

| Fm| Bb7 | EbMaj7 | EbMaj7 |
| Ebm7| Ab7 | DbMaj7 | DbMaj7 |
| C#m| F#7 | BMaj7|BMaj7 |

| Bm| E7| AMaj7 |AMaj7|
| Am| D7| GMaj7 |GMaj7|
| Gm| C7 | FMaj7 |FMaj7|


This yields a never ending progression whose tonal center goes down a whole step each time.

Coltrane decided to alter this "exercise" with some tritone substitutions.

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