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Jazzing Minor Pentatonics

Alfred Scoggins (5191) · [archive]
Style: Jazz · Level: Intermediate · Tempo: 140
Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Dominant chords don't always resolve to their 1 chord. They appear in the middle of tunes, usually as 2-5's, or in the case of the blues at particular times in the sequence. Also, in bridges, they can appear as a sequence on the cycle of fifths.

For the blues, it depends how sophisticated it is. The easiest way I find is to do it like this.

If we take a standard jazzblues progression:

G7 - C7 - G7 - Dm7/G7
C7 - C#0 - G7 - E7
Am7 - D7 - G7/E7 - A7/D7

That can be made more interesting by changing the chords:

G13 - C9 - G13 - Dm7/G7#5b9
C9 - C#o - G13 - E7#9
Am9 - D7#5#9 - G13/Bb13 - A13/Ab13

The same solo can be used over either progression. The second version is played here. I used the following pentatonics:

G13 - Em (mixolydian feel)
C9 - Gm
Dm7 - Dm
G7alt - Bbm
C#o - Gm (this is a continuation of the C9, avoiding the C note in the pentatonic)
E7#9 - Gm (this is the right sound for an altered E7)
Am9 - Dm
D7alt - Fm
G13/Bb13 - A13/Ab13 - Just an Em riff to get back to the G13. A little dissonance here doesn't matter.
Jazzing Minor Pentatonics - Page 6