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The Theory Of Chord Progressions

Robert Ridgeway (1351) · [archive]
Style: Theory/Reference · Level: Beginner · Tempo: 120
Pages: 1

The role of the primary chords - the most important ones - was to determined by what is called cadence . A cadence (from the latin word meaning to fall) describes a concluding phrase or a phrase suggesting conclusion. It normally occurs at or near the end of a melody or a section of music. There are four different cadences in primary chord progressions.

The perfect cadence is the resolution from the V (dominant) to the I(tonic) chord.

The imperfect cadence is the progression from the I(tonic) chord to the V (dominant). It normally occurs in the middle of a chord sequence, not at the end, and can it can be used to describe the movement of any chord to the V - - usually the II, IV or VI.

The plagal cadence is the resolution from the IV (sub-dominant) to the I(tonic) chord.

The interrupted cadence is the progression from the V (dominant) to any chord other than the I (tonic). It is usually to the III, IV or VI.

In traditional harmony, there is a system of general rules for how diatonic chords should be used in a progression. These rules reflect musical tastes at the time the diatonic system came into being.

A I chord can change to any chord.

A II chord can change to any chord except the I chord.

A III chord can change to any chord except the I or VII.

A IV chord can change to any chord.

A V chord can change to any chord except the II or VII.

A VI chord can change to any chord except the I or VII.

A VII chord can change to any chord except the II or IV.